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This week from AGU: India's monsoon, lunar craters, drone squadrons and new research papers

September 16, 2015

GeoSpace

Breaking down India's monsoon

Across key breadbasket regions of India this monsoon season, not enough rain is falling. A new study in Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres dissects the relationship between El Niño and La Niña and the country's monsoonal rainfall, which is currently 12 percent below average and falling.

Asteroids have "fractured and pulverized" the moon's subsurface

Large asteroids that crash into the moon cause fractures to the lunar crust that extend up to 25 kilometers (16 miles) below the moon's surface, finds a new study in Geophysical Research Letters.

Eos.org

Drone squadron to take Earth monitoring to new heights

Scientists will soon be able to call on a community fleet of unmanned aircraft systems to perform environmental studies.

New research papers

Biogenic carbon fluxes from global agricultural production and consumption, Global Biogeochemical Cycles

Pathways and transformations of dissolved methane and dissolved inorganic carbon in Arctic tundra watersheds: Evidence from analysis of stable isotopes, Global Biogeochemical Cycles

An advanced process-based distributed model for the investigation of rainfall-induced landslides: The effect of process representation and boundary conditions, Water Resources Research

The basalts of Mare Frigoris, Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets

Measurement of inner radiation belt electrons with kinetic energy above 1 MeV, Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics
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Related Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Articles:

Dissolved barium as a new quantitative indicator for Kuroshio incursion into the East China Sea
The Kuroshio had great influence on ecological environment of China margin seas, particularly the East China Sea.
How to obtain highly crystalline organic-inorganic perovskite films for solar cells
Members of the Laboratory of New Materials for Solar Energetics, working at the Faculty of Material Sciences, in cooperation with their colleagues from the Faculty of Chemistry of the Lomonosov Moscow State University have elaborated a new method.
Organic-inorganic heterostructures with programmable electronic properties
Researchers from the University of Strasbourg & CNRS (France), in collaboration with the University of Mons (Belgium), the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (Germany) and the Technische Universit├Ąt Dresden (Germany), have devised a novel supramolecular strategy to introduce tunable 1D periodic potentials upon self-assembly of ad hoc organic building blocks on graphene, opening the way to the realization of hybrid organic-inorganic multilayer materials with unique electronic and optical properties.
The carbon dioxide loop
Marine biologists quantify the carbon consumption of bacterioplankton to better understand the ocean carbon cycle.
Fossil or inorganic structure? Scientists dig into early life forms
An international research team found that fossil-like objects grew in natural spring water abundant in the early stages of the Earth.
Iron dissolved by air pollution may increase ocean potential to trap carbon
Iron particles generated by cities and industry are being dissolved by man-made air pollution and washed into the sea -- potentially increasing the amount of greenhouse gases that the world's oceans can absorb, a new study suggests.
Transforming the carbon economy
A task force commissioned in 2016 by former US Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz has proposed a framework for evaluating R&D on recycling carbon dioxide and removing large amounts of CO2 from the atmosphere.
Closing the carbon loop
Research at the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering focused on developing a new catalyst that would lead to large-scale implementation of capture and conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) was recently published in the Royal Society of Chemistry journal Catalysis Science & Technology.
Nanoscale confinement leads to new all-inorganic perovskite with exceptional solar cell properties
Scientists with the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory for the first time discovered how to make perovskite solar cells out of quantum dots and used the new material to convert sunlight to electricity with 10.77 percent efficiency.
At last, an inventory of the ocean's dissolved sulfur
The dissolved fraction of organic sulfur in the ocean is the most abundant form of sulfur there by a factor of ten, a new study finds.

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