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This week from AGU: India's monsoon, lunar craters, drone squadrons and new research papers

September 16, 2015

GeoSpace

Breaking down India's monsoon

Across key breadbasket regions of India this monsoon season, not enough rain is falling. A new study in Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres dissects the relationship between El Niño and La Niña and the country's monsoonal rainfall, which is currently 12 percent below average and falling.

Asteroids have "fractured and pulverized" the moon's subsurface

Large asteroids that crash into the moon cause fractures to the lunar crust that extend up to 25 kilometers (16 miles) below the moon's surface, finds a new study in Geophysical Research Letters.

Eos.org

Drone squadron to take Earth monitoring to new heights

Scientists will soon be able to call on a community fleet of unmanned aircraft systems to perform environmental studies.

New research papers

Biogenic carbon fluxes from global agricultural production and consumption, Global Biogeochemical Cycles

Pathways and transformations of dissolved methane and dissolved inorganic carbon in Arctic tundra watersheds: Evidence from analysis of stable isotopes, Global Biogeochemical Cycles

An advanced process-based distributed model for the investigation of rainfall-induced landslides: The effect of process representation and boundary conditions, Water Resources Research

The basalts of Mare Frigoris, Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets

Measurement of inner radiation belt electrons with kinetic energy above 1 MeV, Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics
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