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A quantum lab for everyone

September 16, 2015

Topical research experiments are often too expensive or too complex to be rebuilt and incorporated in teaching. How can one, nevertheless, make modern science accessible to the public? This challenge was tackled in the research group Quantum Nanophysics led by Markus Arndt at the University of Vienna. For the first time, two research laboratories were created as complete, photorealistic computer simulations allowing university and high-school students as well as the general public to virtually access unique instruments. "One could describe it as a flight simulator of quantum physics", says Mathias Tomandl who designed and implemented the essential elements of the simulation in the course of his PhD studies.

Discovering the quantum world - step by step

A learning path guides the visitors of the virtual quantum lab through the world of delocalized complex molecules. A series of lab tasks and essential background information on the experiments enable the visitors to gradually immerse into the quantum world. The engaging software was developed together with university and high-school students and was fine-tuned by periodic didactic input. The teaching concept and the accompanying studies have now been published in the renowned scientific journal Scientific Reports.

Wave-particle dualism with large molecules

The virtual laboratories provide an insight into the fundamental understanding and into the applications of quantum mechanics with macromolecules and nanoparticles. In recent years, the real-life versions of the experiments verified the wave-particle dualism with the most complex molecules to date. Now, everyone can conduct these experiments in the virtual lab for the first time.

The quantum lab on tour through Austria

Currrently, a light version of the virtual lab can be experienced as an interactive exhibit in the special exhibition "Das Wissen der Dinge" in the Natural History Museum Vienna. In the travelling exhibition "Wirkungswechsel" of the Science-Center-Netzwerk the exhibit will be available at various locations throughout Austria.
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Acknowledgements

We acknowledge the support by the Vienna Business Agency ZIT (957475), the Austrian Science Fund FWF (Z149-N16 and WKP-16) and the European Research Council (ERC 320694).

Publication in Scientific Reports:

Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science;
Mathias Tomandl, Thomas Mieling, Christiane M. Losert-Valiente Kroon, Martin Hopf & Markus Arndt. Scientific Reports 5, 14108 (2015)
doi: 10.1038/srep14108 http://www.nature.com/articles/srep14108

Further information

Video - interactive quantum lab: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3vPSFotrmME

Special exhibition "Das Wissen der Dinge": http://www.nhm-wien.ac.at/ausstellung/sonderausstellungen/das_wissen_der_dinge_1

Travelling exhibition "Wirkungswechsel": http://www.wirkungswechsel.at/

The University of Vienna, founded in 1365, is one of the oldest and largest universities in Europe. About 9,500 employees, 6,700 of who are academic employees, work at 19 faculties and centres. This makes the University of Vienna Austria's largest research and education institution. About 92,000 national and international students are currently enrolled at the University of Vienna. With more than 180 degree programmes, the University offers the most diverse range of studies in Austria. The University of Vienna is also a major provider of continuing education. In 2015, the Alma Mater Rudolphina Vindobonensis celebrates its 650th Anniversary. http://www.univie.ac.at

University of Vienna

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