A link between Jacobsen syndrome and autism

September 17, 2014



SAN DIEGO, Calif. (Sept. 17, 2014)-- A rare genetic disorder known as Jacobsen syndrome has been linked with autism, according to a recent joint investigation by researchers at San Diego State University and the University of California, San Diego. In addition to suggesting better treatment options for people with Jacobsen syndrome, the finding also offers more clues into the genetic underpinnings of autism.

Jacobsen syndrome affects approximately 1 in 100,000 people, according to the National Institutes of Health. It occurs in a person when there is a deletion at the end of one arm of the 11th chromosome, known as an 11q terminal deletion. The symptoms and physiological changes vary, but commonly include intellectual disability, abnormal facial development, structural kidney anomalies and congenital heart defects.

The idea for the recent study arose when UCSD cardiologist Paul Grossfeld, while looking into heart defects associated with the disease, became interested in the cognitive impairments that were so common in this disorder. He reached out SDSU neuropsychologist Sarah Mattson, whose work primarily focuses on the effects of fetal alcohol exposure, and UCSD neuropsychologist Natacha Akshoomoff, an expert in autism.

Familiar symptoms


The researchers quickly recognized a familiar suite of symptoms.

"It became apparent that parents were reporting autism-like features," Mattson said.

To test their theory, the researchers would need a controlled study and a larger sample size, and San Diego was the perfect location to do this.

Every two years, families with children who have Jacobsen syndrome come to San Diego from around the world for the 11q Conference to meet with one another and share the latest findings about the disorder.

"Because Jacobsen syndrome is a pretty rare disorder, the conference is extremely helpful for investigating research questions," Mattson explained.

Mattson, Akshoomoff and Grossfeld recruited 17 children and their parents for the study. They gave the parents behavioral and cognitive questionnaires about their children, and the researchers also observed the children themselves, aided by a diagnostic tool for autism known as the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule.

Eight of the 17 children met the criteria for autism spectrum disorder, which is "a much higher rate than the general population," Mattson said. The researchers published their results in the journal Genetics in Medicine.

Early intervention


One of the primary implications for families dealing with Jacobsen syndrome is simply being aware that their children are at a higher risk for autism, Mattson said. Knowing this, they can investigate early intervention treatments to help their children better understand their particular way of seeing and interacting with the world as well as strategies for navigating social situations more easily.

The findings will also be of benefit to autism researchers, Mattson said, as it's another genetic clue to what drives the cognitive differences in people with the disorder.

"We know there are functional genes within that region of the 11th chromosome, some of which are related to brain development," Mattson said. "Knowing this may give researchers more insight into Jacobsen syndrome as well as the development of autism spectrum disorder."
-end-
About San Diego State University

San Diego State University is a major public research institution offering bachelor's degrees in 91 areas, master's degrees in 78 areas and doctorates in 22 areas. The university provides transformative experiences, both inside and outside of the classroom, for its 35,000 students. Students participate in research, international experiences, sustainability and entrepreneurship initiatives, and a broad range of student life and leadership opportunities. The university's rich campus life features opportunities for students to participate in, and engage with, the creative and performing arts, a Division I athletics program and the vibrant cultural life of the San Diego region. For more information, visit http://www.sdsu.edu.

San Diego State University

Related Autism Articles from Brightsurf:

Autism-cholesterol link
Study identifies genetic link between cholesterol alterations and autism.

National Autism Indicators Report: the connection between autism and financial hardship
A.J. Drexel Autism Institute released the 2020 National Autism Indicators Report highlighting the financial challenges facing households of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including higher levels of poverty, material hardship and medical expenses.

Autism risk estimated at 3 to 5% for children whose parents have a sibling with autism
Roughly 3 to 5% of children with an aunt or uncle with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can also be expected to have ASD, compared to about 1.5% of children in the general population, according to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Adulthood with autism
The independence that comes with growing up can be scary for any teenager, but for young adults with autism spectrum disorder and their caregivers, the transition from adolescence to adulthood can seem particularly daunting.

Brain protein mutation from child with autism causes autism-like behavioral change in mice
A de novo gene mutation that encodes a brain protein in a child with autism has been placed into the brains of mice.

Autism and theory of mind
Theory of mind, or the ability to represent other people's minds as distinct from one's own, can be difficult for people with autism.

Potential biomarker for autism
A study of young children with autism spectrum disorder published in JNeurosci reveals altered brain waves compared to typically developing children during a motor control task.

Autism often associated with multiple new mutations
Most autism cases are in families with no previous history of the disorder.

State laws requiring autism coverage by private insurers led to increases in autism care
A new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health has found that the enactment of state laws mandating coverage of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was followed by sizable increases in insurer-covered ASD care and associated spending.

Autism's gender patterns
Having one child with autism is a well-known risk factor for having another one with the same disorder, but whether and how a sibling's gender influences this risk has remained largely unknown.

Read More: Autism News and Autism Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.