New guideline recommends weight loss strategies for sleep apnea patients

September 17, 2018

Sept. 17, 2018--A new guideline focused on the role of weight management in treating adult obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has been published online by the American Thoracic Society in the Sept. 15 American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

OSA is a common disease that occurs when the upper airway becomes blocked repeatedly during sleep, reducing or stopping airflow. Being overweight or obese is a strong risk factor for OSA, and weight loss can often reduce the severity of OSA.

"This guideline expands the content of previous clinical practice guidelines addressing the care of OSA patients who are overweight or obese by offering specific recommendations for weight loss and discussing the evidence for each recommendation," said David W. Hudgel, MD, panel chair and a specialist and investigator in sleep-disordered breathing. "In addition to these scientifically derived recommendations, the guideline reviews and discusses successful methods for practitioners to discuss weight issues and ways to interact with patients who are overweight or obese."

The 20-member guideline panel - which included sleep, pulmonary, weight management and behavioral experts, as well as three patients - reviewed scores of studies and rated the strength of study findings, along with the certainty of the panel's recommendations, using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system.

For patients with OSA who are overweight or obese (body mass index - BMI ? 25 kg/m2 ) the panel:

For patients with OSA who have a BMI ?27 kg/m2 and whose weight has not improved despite participating in a comprehensive program--and who have no contraindications to pharmacotherapy such as active cardiovascular disease--the panel:

The panel defined active cardiovascular diseases as "myocardial infarction or cerebrovascular accident within the past six months, uncontrolled hypertension, life-threatening arrhythmias or decompensated congestive heart failure."

For patients with OSA who have a BMI ? 35 kg/m2 and whose weight has not improved despite participating in a comprehensive weight loss lifestyle intervention program--and who have no contraindications--the panel:
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