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Changes in lung cancer treatment during COVID-19 pandemic

September 17, 2020

What The Study Did: Changes in lung cancer treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic were evaluated in this study.

Authors: Nathaniel Bouganim, M.D., of Cedars Cancer Center, McGill University Health Centre in Montreal, is the corresponding author.

To access the embargoed study: Visit our For The Media website at this link https://media.jamanetwork.com/ 

(doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2020.4408)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflicts of interest disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, conflict of interest and financial disclosures, and funding and support.

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Media advisory: The full study is linked to this news release.

Embed this link to provide your readers free access to the full-text article This link will be live at the embargo time https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaoncology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamaoncol.2020.4408?guestAccessKey=2700be64-0196-4305-9b59-73b983666e60&utm_source=For_The_Media&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=ftm_links&utm_content=tfl&utm_term=091720
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JAMA Oncology

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