SHEA endorses requiring recommended vaccinations for healthcare personnel, educators and students

September 17, 2020

NEW YORK (September 17, 2020) -- All healthcare personnel should be immunized against vaccine preventable diseases recommended by U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (CDC/ACIP) as a condition of employment, according to a new policy statement by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The broad statement of support of the vaccination recommendations, published in the journal Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology, suggests medical contraindications as the only exception to receiving recommended immunizations.

"Millions of lives have been saved and debilitating diseases have been prevented through vaccinations," said David J. Weber, MD, MPH, co-lead author of the statement and a member of the SHEA Board of Trustees. "It is critical that we continue to use immunizations to the fullest degree possible to keep vaccine-preventable illnesses in check in the U.S."

Because immunizations are safe and effective in reducing disease transmission, and as a result of recent declines in use, the writing panel of 14 infectious diseases experts outlined supporting rationale for recommended vaccinations, except for individuals with a medical condition/allergy that would make them unsafe.

The statement made three specific recommendations:
-end-
David J. Weber (co-lead), Thomas R. Talbot (co-lead), Cristopher Baliga, Marcie Drees, Robert Duncan, Kelly Echevarria, Alan Gross, Emily Heil, Trini Mathew, William Schaffner, Eddie Stenehjem, Patricia Stinchfield, Jamie Wagner, and Allison Weinman. "Policy Statement from the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA): Only medical contraindications should be accepted as a reason for not receiving all routine immunizations as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention." Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. Web (September 17, 2020).

About ICHE

Published through a partnership between the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America and Cambridge University Press, Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology provides original, peer reviewed scientific articles for anyone involved with an infection control or epidemiology program in a hospital or healthcare facility. ICHE is ranked 41st out of 89 Infectious Disease Journals in the latest Web of Knowledge Journal Citation Reports from Thomson Reuters.

The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) is a professional society representing more than 2,000 physicians and other healthcare professionals around the world who possess expertise and passion for healthcare epidemiology, infection prevention, and antimicrobial stewardship. The society's work improves public health by establishing infection-prevention measures and supporting antibiotic stewardship among healthcare providers, hospitals, and health systems. This is accomplished by leading research studies, translating research into clinical practice, developing evidence-based policies, optimizing antibiotic stewardship, and advancing the field of healthcare epidemiology. SHEA and its members strive to improve patient outcomes and create a safer, healthier future for all. Visit SHEA online at http://www.shea-online.org, http://www.facebook.com/SHEApreventingHAIs and @SHEA_Epi.

About Cambridge University Press

Cambridge University Press is part of the University of Cambridge. It furthers the University's mission by disseminating knowledge in the pursuit of education, learning and research at the highest international levels of excellence. Its extensive peer-reviewed publishing lists comprise 45,000 titles covering academic research, professional development, over 400 research journals, school-level education, English language teaching and bible publishing. Playing a leading role in today's international marketplace, Cambridge University Press has over 50 offices around the globe, and it distributes its products to nearly every country in the world. For further information about Cambridge University Press, visit Cambridge.org.

Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America

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