Nav: Home

Failure rate in some surgical mesh treatments unacceptably high - Biomedical review

September 18, 2018

Failure rates in some treatments using surgical mesh are unacceptably high according to a newly published comprehensive biomedical review that considers the findings from peer-reviewed scientific articles assessing its use. In addition, the review concludes that more experiments should have been conducted to properly assess how surgical mesh would behave in some of the bodily environments in which it has recently been used, such as the vagina and urinary system.

Surgical mesh is a fabric-like material which has been used, successfully, for over 50 years in the repair of hernias. In recent years, however, medical companies developed new products using this same mesh, for operations involving organs in the pelvic region. Many patients, the great majority being women, were implanted with pieces of mesh in operations to correct urinary incontinence and prolapse of organs such as the vagina, which frequently occurs after childbirth.

Many of these women have been condemned to a lifetime of pain and discomfort because the mesh has caused damage to surrounding organs and tissues, and it cannot be removed. As a result, the use of these products has been banned or restricted in many countries including the US, UK, Australia and New Zealand. In Ireland, medics and government have been slow to realise the extent of the problem, but in July this year the Minister for Health announced that a pause had been placed on the use of these products pending a full investigation into their use and the risks involved.

The new review article, authored by Professor of Materials Engineering at Trinity College Dublin, David Taylor, considers the findings of a wide variety of scientific and medical sources, from material test reports to clinical case studies. It has just been published by a leading scientific journal - the Journal of the Mechanical Behaviour of Biomedical Materials.

Professor Taylor, an expert on medical materials working in the Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, said: "The use of surgical mesh to treat pelvic organ prolapse and urinary incontinence seems to provide another example in which new products have been developed that expand the use of existing materials without conducting the necessary experiments to properly understand the material, and how it will react in its new application."

"Very severe consequences can result from mesh erosion, when the mesh material damages the surrounding tissues. The prolapse products caused mesh erosion in over 10% of cases, rising to almost 30% in some studies, which I concluded was unacceptably high. In the case of urinary incontinence products, erosion occurs less often, around 2% to 3%, so my opinion is that patients should be given more information to allow them to make an informed decision about the risks involved."

"Chemical degradation of the material due to bacterial infection, and poor surgical technique are two potential reasons for the failures, but further work is needed - especially the examination of failed mesh products - to properly determine the underlying causes of this problem."
-end-


Trinity College Dublin

Related Urinary Incontinence Articles:

Magnetic stimulation dramatically improves fecal incontinence
Painless magnetic stimulation of nerves that regulate muscles in the anus and rectum appears to improve their function and dramatically reduce episodes of fecal incontinence, a debilitating problem affecting about 10% of the population, investigators report.
New research takes p*** out of incontinence
Millions of people might eventually be spared the embarrassment and extreme isolation caused by wetting themselves, thanks to new research.
Does adding therapy before, after surgery for urinary incontinence help?
Adding behavioral and physical therapy before and after surgery for women with stress and urgency urinary incontinence resulted in a small improvement in symptoms compared to women who just had surgery but that difference in symptoms may not be clinically important.
Study shows advantages for stress urinary incontinence surgery
One of the most commonly performed surgeries to treat stress urinary incontinence in women may have better long-term results than another common surgical technique, according to a study led by Mayo Clinic researchers.
Childbirth delivery methods and risk of incontinence, overactive bladder
Pelvic floor disorders such as urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse (when one or more of the pelvic organs drop from their normal position) are associated with childbirth and affect millions of women in the United States.
Getting relief from sexual dysfunction and incontinence caused by menopause
Microablative fractional CO2 lasers are energy-based devices designed to help manage troublesome menopause symptoms such as painful sex, dryness, itching/burning, urinary frequency, and incontinence.
Overweight and obesity linked to higher risk of urinary incontinence for women
Being overweight or obese is linked with an increased risk of developing urinary incontinence for young to mid-aged women, according to an Obesity Reviews analysis of all relevant published studies.
WPSI says screen all women annually for urinary incontinence
All women should be screened annually for urinary incontinence, according to new guidelines from the Women's Preventive Services Initiative (WPSI).
Men tolerate stress incontinence years before seeking help
Men often tolerate stress urinary incontinence for more than two years before seeking medical help -- and one-third put up with it for more than five years, making it important for doctors to check for this problem, a new study from UT Southwestern researchers advises.
Chronic medical conditions are common in women with urinary incontinence
New research published in BJU International indicates that women with urinary incontinence often have other chronic conditions.
More Urinary Incontinence News and Urinary Incontinence Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Sound And Silence
Sound surrounds us, from cacophony even to silence. But depending on how we hear, the world can be a different auditory experience for each of us. This hour, TED speakers explore the science of sound. Guests on the show include NPR All Things Considered host Mary Louise Kelly, neuroscientist Jim Hudspeth, writer Rebecca Knill, and sound designer Dallas Taylor.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#576 Science Communication in Creative Places
When you think of science communication, you might think of TED talks or museum talks or video talks, or... people giving lectures. It's a lot of people talking. But there's more to sci comm than that. This week host Bethany Brookshire talks to three people who have looked at science communication in places you might not expect it. We'll speak with Mauna Dasari, a graduate student at Notre Dame, about making mammals into a March Madness match. We'll talk with Sarah Garner, director of the Pathologists Assistant Program at Tulane University School of Medicine, who takes pathology instruction out of...
Now Playing: Radiolab

Kittens Kick The Giggly Blue Robot All Summer
With the recent passing of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, there's been a lot of debate about how much power the Supreme Court should really have. We think of the Supreme Court justices as all-powerful beings, issuing momentous rulings from on high. But they haven't always been so, you know, supreme. On this episode, we go all the way back to the case that, in a lot of ways, started it all.  Support Radiolab by becoming a member today at Radiolab.org/donate.