Tip sheet for Annals of Internal Medicine, Sept. 20, 2005 issue

September 19, 2005

1. Canadian Drugs on Internet Are Much Cheaper Than U.S. Internet Drugs

A December 2, 2004, survey of drug prices of 41 retail brand-name medications advertised on Web sites of 12 Canadian pharmacies and 3 large American pharmacy chains found that 43 of the 44 drugs were less expensive at the Canadian pharmacies (Article, p. 397).

The three drugs more expensive at the Canadian pharmacies were drugs for erectile dysfunction (impotence).

Researchers estimate that Americans could save approximately 24 percent per dose if they purchase their prescription drugs from Canada.

2. Study Finds Second-Generation Antidepressants Similar

Researchers comparing published studies of the efficacy, effectiveness, safety and side effects of second-generation antidepressants in treating depression found not much difference among them (Article, p. 415).

"Response rates differed only minimally and ... overall rates of adverse events and discontinuation of therapy were similar ...," they say.

Adverse effects (side effects) differed, but few studies used a standardized scale to measure these effects.

Second-generation antidepressants include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), selected norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and other drugs.

Researchers conclude that choosing the most appropriate antidepressant for a given patent is difficult.

3. Targeted Health Program for Musculoskeletal Disorders Reduces Short- and Long-Term Work Disability and Is Cost Effective

A study of a program that treated 13,077 patients with musculoskeletal disorders (painful conditions of the muscles, bones, tendons, and joints) with either regular care or a special health program found that the special program shortened temporary work disability and reduced the number of patients who went on permanent disability (Article, p. 404).

Regular care included treatment by a primary care physician with referral to a specialist if needed. The targeted program included unlimited visits to a rheumatologist, education, and free medications.

While the special program was relatively expensive, by the end of the second year, the program saved between $8 and $20 for every dollar invested and overall saved more than $5 million.
-end-


American College of Physicians

Related Side Effects Articles from Brightsurf:

Side effects often attributed to statins were the same for those taking a placebo
Study participants who reported side effects from cholesterol-lowering medications known as statins also reported the same side effects when they unknowingly took placebo pills.

Cancer treatment without side effects?
Treating cancer without debilitating side effects has long been the holy grail of oncologists, and researchers at the University of California, Irvine and Switzerland's Lausanne University Hospital may have found it.

Finding cortisone alternatives with fewer side effects
Many people use cortisone of a regular basis. It is used for treating rheumatism, asthma, multiple sclerosis, or even COVID-19.

Blood-thinner with no bleeding side-effects is here
In a study led by EPFL, scientists have developed a synthetic blood-thinner that, unlike all others, doesn't cause bleeding side-effects.

Predicting side effects
Scientists develop AI-based tool to predict adverse drug events. Such events are responsible for some 2 million U.S. hospitalizations per year.

Vitamin D could help mitigate chemotherapy side effects
New findings by University of South Australia researchers reveal that Vitamin D could potentially mitigate chemotherapy-induced gastrointestinal mucositis and provide relief to cancer patients.

What if we could design powerful drugs without unwanted side effects?
The paper describes how to minimize or eliminate side effects in drugs that target G protein-coupled receptors.

Variation in how side effects are reported clouds drug safety
University of Colorado Cancer Center study finds significant variation in how drug side effects are reported, potentially making some drugs seem safer or less safe than they really are.

New drug can ease the side effects of medication against severe depression
Today, severe depressions require a high dose of antidepressants. However, the high dose may also cause serious side effects.

University of Cincinnati research looks at side effects for pediatric medications
Dr. Jeffrey Strawn, associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, and Jeffrey Mills, associate professor in the Department of Economics at the UC Lindner College of Business, published a study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry looking specifically at side effects that impact children and adolescents being treated for anxiety disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

Read More: Side Effects News and Side Effects Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.