Overweight and obesity linked to higher risk of urinary incontinence for women

September 19, 2018

Being overweight or obese is linked with an increased risk of developing urinary incontinence for young to mid-aged women, according to an Obesity Reviews analysis of all relevant published studies.

When compared with 'normal' body mass index, overweight was associated with a one-third increase in risk of urinary incontinence, while the risk was doubled in women with obesity.

The findings indicate that clinical advice to young women who are obese or at risk of becoming obese should not be limited to metabolic health, but should also emphasize the role of excess weight on pelvic floor weakening and subsequent risk of incontinence.

"We know that urinary incontinence can be a complex issue, especially among younger women," said lead author Tayla Lamerton, of The University of Queensland, in Australia. "Understanding overweight and obesity as a determinant of urinary incontinence could play a role in the way we counsel those affected by the condition, and our findings provide a building block to further explore lifestyle interventions for preventing and managing incontinence."
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Additional Information

Link to Study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/obr.12756

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Obesity Reviews is a monthly journal publishing reviews on all disciplines related to obesity and its comorbidities. This includes basic and behavioral sciences, clinical treatment and outcomes, epidemiology, prevention and public health. The journal should, therefore, appeal to all professionals with an interest in obesity and its comorbidities. Review types may include systematic narrative reviews, quantitative meta-analyses and narrative reviews but all must offer new insights, critical or novel perspectives that will enhance the state of knowledge in the field. Prevalence studies that compare (review) trends across countries or regions or across ethnic groups or relevant subpopulations and provide novel insights and/or conclusions will be considered. The journal also invites short reviews presenting original or challenging theories, hypotheses or alternative interpretations of findings. Case reports presenting important and novel information and Letters to the Editor are also welcome. The journal will contribute to education and inter-professional developments by planning pro and con reviews on current controversies.

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