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journal of Dental Research centennial featured article: Tooth bioengineering and regene

September 20, 2019

Alexandria, VA, USA - 2019 marks the Centennial of the Journal of Dental Research (JDR). Over the last century the JDR has been dedicated to the dissemination of new knowledge and information on all sciences relevant to dentistry and to the oral cavity and associated structures in health and disease.

To celebrate, the JDR is featuring a yearlong, monthly commemorative article and podcast series that highlights topics that have transformed dental, oral and craniofacial research over the past 100 years.

Over the past 100 years, tremendous progress has been made in the fields of dental tissue engineering and regenerative dental medicine, collectively known as translational dentistry. The October 2019 JDR Centennial article, "Tooth Bioengineering and Regenerative Dentistry" by Pamela Yelick, Tufts University, Boston, Mass., USA and Paul Sharpe, King's College London, England, discuss key successes that have contributed most to current knowledge and understanding of regenerative dentistry and hypothesize what to expect over the next century.

"This is an exciting era in Regenerative Dentistry, and in particular for whole tooth tissue engineering," said Yelick. "We anticipate that continued advances in the fields of dental tissue engineering and regenerative dental medicine will facilitate the development of improved dental repair therapies, including whole tooth tissue engineering."

"At the present time, the overall concept of tooth bioengineering has been proven in principle. Combinations of adult and embryonic cells from mice and humans have been shown to form tooth primordia in vitro," said Sharpe. "Surgical transplantation of these constructs into the mouth was shown to provide a suitable environment for their development into fully functional, erupted teeth."
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The October 2019 issue of the JDR also includes a JDR Centennial podcast "Tooth Bioengineering and Regenerative Dentistry," which features a conversation between Yelick, Sharpe and JDR Editor-in-Chief William Giannobile, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA, and Historical Highlight 11 on breath malodor by JDR Associate Editor, Nicholas Jakubovics, Newcastle University, England.

The legacy of the JDR was honored during a celebration at the 97th General Session of the IADR, held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the AADR and the 43rdAnnual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada on June 19-22, 2019. Visit JDRcentennial">http://www.iadr.org/JDRcentennial to view the full JDR Centnenial collection of articles, podcasts, videos and Historical Highlights.

Click here to view a PDF of this press release.

About the Journal of Dental Research

The IADR/AADR Journal of Dental Research (JDR) is a multidisciplinary journal dedicated to the dissemination of new knowledge in all sciences relevant to dentistry and the oral cavity and associated structures in health and disease. The JDR continues to rank #1 of 90 journals in Eigenfactor with a score of 0.021290, ranks #2 in Impact Factor of 90 journals in the "Dentistry, Oral Surgery & Medicine" category at 5.125 and ranks #2 of 90 in Article Influence with a score of 1.643.The JDR's 5-year Impact Factor has remained above 5 for the fourth year at 5.722, ranking #2 of 91 journals. With over 20,000 citations, the JDR also boasts the most citations in the "Dentistry, Oral Surgery & Medicine" category -- 4,500 citations above the second ranked journal in the field.

International Association for Dental Research

The International Association for Dental Research (IADR) is a nonprofit organization with over 11,400 individual members worldwide, with a Mission to drive dental, oral and craniofacial research to advance health and well-being worldwide. To learn more, visit http://www.iadr.org. The American Association for Dental Research (AADR) is the largest Division of IADR with 3,300 members in the United States. To learn more, visit http://www.iadr.org/aadr.

International & American Associations for Dental Research

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