FRAX calculator issued in version 3.4

September 21, 2011

FRAX®, the widely used online fracture risk assessment calculator hosted at the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield (http://www.shef.ac.uk/FRAX), has now been released in version 3.4. With 18 languages, 38 models, and availability as a desktop option, FRAX® is becoming increasingly accessible to clinicians around the world.

New - FRAX® Desktop:

FRAX® is now available for use without internet. Subscriptions are available for individual or multi-patient entry versions. The application can be downloaded at http://www.who-frax.org/

Now in 18 languages with the addition of Italian and Romanian:

FRAX® is available in 18 languages: English, Arabic, Chinese simplified, Chinese traditional, Czech, Danish, Finnish, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Polish, Romanian, Russian, Spanish, Swedish, Turkish

Thirty-eight specific models:

FRAX® has been integrated in many national osteoporosis guidelines, including those of the USA, Canada and the UK. The calculator is available in 38 models for the following countries/regions/territories around the world: Use of the online FRAX® tool at http://www.shef.ac.uk/FRAX/ is free of charge. Offline versions are available as an iPhone Application or as FRAX® Desktop download. In addition, the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) hosts teaching resources and downloadable questionnaires on its website at www.iofbonehealth.org
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About FRAX®

The ultimate aim of the clinician in the management of osteoporosis should be to reduce the risk of fractures. Treatment decisions must be made through good clinical judgment and through improved identification of patients at high risk. FRAX® is a simple calculation tool that integrates clinical information in a quantitative manner to predict a 10-year probability of major osteoporotic fracture for both women and men in different countries. Developed at the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases, University of Sheffield, UK, the tool assists primary health care providers to better target people in need of intervention, improving the allocation of healthcare resources towards patients most likely to benefit from treatment. The tool can be accessed free of charge at http://www.shef.ac.uk/FRAX/ and is also available as a desktop application or iPhone App.

About IOF

The International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF) is a non-profit, nongovernmental umbrella organization dedicated to the worldwide fight against osteoporosis, the disease known as "the silent epidemic". IOF's members - committees of scientific researchers, patient, medical and research societies and industry representatives from around the world - share a common vision of a world without osteoporotic fractures. IOF now represents 199 societies in 93 locations. http://www.iofbonehealth.org

International Osteoporosis Foundation

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