NASA catches Tropical Storm Dolphin swimming north   

September 22, 2020

NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Tropical Storm Dolphin as it continued moving north though the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on a track toward east central Japan.

NASA Satellite View: Dolphin's Organization

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Dolphin on Sept. 22 at 0345 UTC (Sept. 21 at 11:45 p.m. EDT). The visible image revealed strong storms around the low-level center of circulation with bands of thunderstorms in the northeastern quadrant. Microwave satellite imagery revealed an eye feature.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that another satellite image indicates that the upper-level circulation center is tilted about 30 nautical miles east of the low-level center due to increasing westerly vertical wind shear.

NASA's Terra satellite is one in a fleet of NASA satellites that provide data for hurricane research.

Dolphin on Sept. 22

At 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC) on Sept. 22 Tropical storm Dolphin was located near latitude 27.9 degrees north and longitude 135.5 degrees east, about 493 nautical miles south-southwest of Yokosuka, Japan. Dolphin was moving to the north and had maximum sustained winds 60 knots (69 mph/111 kph).

Dolphin will move north, later turning to the northeast. It is expected to weaken gradually before becoming extra-tropical near Tokyo.

NASA Researches Earth from Space

For more than five decades, NASA has used the vantage point of space to understand and explore our home planet, improve lives and safeguard our future. NASA brings together technology, science, and unique global Earth observations to provide societal benefits and strengthen our nation. Advancing knowledge of our home planet contributes directly to America's leadership in space and scientific exploration.

By Rob Gutro NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
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NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

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