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Engineering the meniscus

September 23, 2019

New Rochelle, NY, September 23, 2019-Damage to the meniscus is common, but there remains an unmet need for improved restorative therapies that can overcome poor healing in the avascular regions. Now, researchers have reported a new method that may help by growing meniscal cells on 3D electrospun nanofiber scaffolds. Their work is published in Tissue Engineering, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. Click here to read the article for free on the Tissue Engineering website through October 23, 2019.

Darryl D. D'Lima, MD, PhD, Shiley Center for Orthopaedic Research at Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, CA, with colleagues from Scripps Clinic and Scripps Research Institute, present their work in an article titled "Core-Shell Nanofibrous Scaffolds for Repair of Meniscus Tears". The authors created a core-shell scaffold material by the co-axial electrospinning of a polylactic acid core with a collagen shell, seeded it with meniscal cells, and monitored tissue development based on gene expression and histology. These constructs were used to repair tears in meniscal explants and showed good integration.

"Meniscal injuries in the avascular region can be notoriously difficult to treat," says Tissue Engineering Co-Editor-in-Chief Antonios G. Mikos, PhD, Louis Calder Professor at Rice University, Houston, TX. "The ex vivo tissue repair results from this article demonstrate the therapeutic promise of the co-axial electrospinning strategy, potentially altering the treatment paradigm for such injuries."
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About the Journal

Tissue Engineering is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published monthly online and in print in three parts: Part A, the flagship journal published 24 times per year; Part B: Reviews, published bimonthly, and Part C: Methods, published 12 times per year. Led by Co-Editors-in-Chief Antonios G. Mikos, PhD, Louis Calder Professor at Rice University, Houston, TX, and John P. Fisher, PhD, Fischell Family Distinguished Professor & Department Chair, and Director of the NIH Center for Engineering Complex Tissues at the University of Maryland, the Journal brings together scientific and medical experts in the fields of biomedical engineering, material science, molecular and cellular biology, and genetic engineering. Leadership of Tissue Engineering Parts B (Reviews) and Part C (Methods) is provided by Katja Schenke-Layland, PhD, Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Heungsoo Shin, PhD, Hanyang University; and John A. Jansen, DDS, PhD, Radboud University, and Xiumei Wang, PhD, Tsinghua University respectively. Tissue Engineering is the official journal of the Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine International Society (TERMIS). Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Tissue Engineering website.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Stem Cells and Development, Human Gene Therapy, and Advances in Wound Care. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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Scientists use molecular tethers, chemical 'light sabers' for tissue engineering
Researchers at the University of Washington unveiled a new strategy to keep proteins intact and functional in synthetic biomaterials for tissue engineering.
UCI engineers aim to pioneer tissue-engineering approach to TMJ disorders
Here's something to chew on: One in four people are impacted by defects of the temporomandibular - or jaw - joint.
Scientists develop a cellulose biosensor material for advanced tissue engineering
I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University teamed up together with Irish colleagues to develop a new imaging approach for tissue engineering.
The use of electrospun scaffolds in musculoskeletal tissue engineering
Rotator Cuff tears affect 15 percent of 60 year olds and carry a significant social and financial burden.
Types and preparation techniques of scaffold materials in cartilage tissue engineering
Chondral defects caused by tumor, trauma, infection, congenital malformations are very common in clinical trials.
Novel method for precise, controllable cell deposition onto tissue engineering constructs
A new study presents a novel method of using a microfluidic flow cell array to achieve precise and reproducible control of cell deposition onto engineered tissue constructs to produce tunable cell patterns and generate essential integration zones.
Farewell flat biology -- Tackling infectious disease using 3-D tissue engineering
In a new invited review article, ASU Biodesign microbiologists and tissue engineers Cheryl Nickerson, Jennifer Barrila and colleagues discuss the development and application of three-dimensional (3-D) tissue culture models as they pertain to infectious disease.
Novel microplate 3D bioprinting platform for muscle & tendon tissue engineering
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3D printed sugar offers sweet solution for tissue engineering, device manufacturing
University of Illinois engineers built a 3D printer that offers a sweet solution to making detailed structures that commercial 3D printers can't: Rather than a layer-upon-layer solid shell, it produces a delicate network of thin ribbons of hardened isomalt, the type of sugar alcohol used to make throat lozenges.
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