Nav: Home

'Valley states' in this 2D material could potentially be used for quantum computing

September 23, 2019

BUFFALO, N.Y. -- New research on two-dimensional tungsten disulfide (WS2) could open the door to advances in quantum computing.

In a paper published Sept. 13 in Nature Communications, scientists report that they can manipulate the electronic properties of this super-thin material in ways that could be useful for encoding quantum data.

The study deals with WS2's energy valleys, which University at Buffalo physicist Hao Zeng, co-lead author of the paper, describes as "the local energy extrema of the electronic structure in a crystalline solid."

Valleys correspond with specific energies that electrons can have in a material, and the presence of an electron in one valley versus another can be used to encode information. An electron in one valley can represent a 1 in binary code, while an electron in the other can represent a 0.

The ability to control where electrons might be found could yield advances in quantum computing, enabling the creation of qubits, the basic unit of quantum information. Qubits have the mysterious quality of being able to exist not just in a state of 1 or 0, but in a "superposition" related to both states.

The paper in Nature Communications marks a step toward these future technologies, demonstrating a novel method of manipulating valley states in WS2.

Zeng, PhD, professor of physics in the UB College of Arts and Sciences, led the project with Athos Petrou, PhD, UB Distinguished Professor of Physics, and Renat Sabirianov, PhD, chair of physics at the University of Nebraska Omaha. Additional co-authors included UB physics graduate students Tenzin Norden, Chuan Zhao and Peiyao Zhang. The research was funded by the National Science Foundation.

Shifting tungsten disulfide's energy valleys

Two-dimensional tungsten disulfide is a single layer of the material that's three atoms thick. In this configuration, WS2 has two energy valleys, both with the same energy.

Past research has shown that applying a magnetic field can shift the energy of the valleys in opposite directions, lowering the energy of one valley to make it "deeper" and more attractive to electrons, while raising the energy of the other valley to make it "shallower," Zeng says.

The new study builds on this prior work by adding another innovation.

"We show that the shift in the energy of the two valleys can be enlarged by two orders of magnitude if we place a thin layer of magnetic europium sulfide under the tungsten disulfide," Zeng says. "When we then apply a magnetic field of 1 Tesla, we are able to achieve an enormous shift in the energy of the valleys -- equivalent to what we might hope to achieve by applying a magnetic field of about a hundred Tesla if the europium sulfide were not present."

"The size of the effect was very large -- it was like using a magnetic field amplifier," Petrou says. "It was so surprising that we had to check it several times to make sure we didn't make mistakes."

The end result? The ability to manipulate and detect electrons in the valleys is greatly enhanced, qualities that could facilitate the control of qubits for quantum computing.

Valley states as qubits for quantum computing

Like other forms of quantum computing, valley-based quantum computing would rely on the quirky qualities of subatomic particles -- in this case electrons -- to perform powerful calculations.

Electrons behave in ways that may seem odd -- they can be in multiple places at once, for instance. As a result, 1 and 0 are not the only possible states in systems that use electrons in valleys as qubits. A qubit can also be in any superposition of these states, allowing quantum computers to explore many possibilities simultaneously, Zeng says.

"This is why quantum computing is so powerful for certain special tasks," Zeng says. "Due to the probabilistic and random nature of quantum computing, it is particularly suitable for applications such as artificial intelligence, cryptography, financial modeling and quantum mechanical simulations for designing better materials. However, a lot of obstacles need to be overcome, and we are likely many years away if scalable universal quantum computing ever becomes a reality."

The new study builds on Zeng and Petrou's prior work, in which they used europium sulfide and magnetic fields to alter the energy of two valleys in another 2D material: tungsten diselenide (WSe2).

Though WS2 and WSe2 are similar, they responded differently to the "valley splitting" exercise. In WS2, the valley that got "deeper" was analogous to the valley in WSe2 that became "shallower," and vice versa, creating opportunities to explore how this distinction could provide flexibility in applications of the technology.

One characteristic that both materials share could benefit quantum computing: In both WS2 and WSe2, electrons populating the two energy valleys have opposite spins, a form of angular momentum. While this trait is not necessary for creating a qubit, it "provides certain protection of the quantum states, making them more robust," Zeng says.
-end-


University at Buffalo

Related Magnetic Field Articles:

Earth's last magnetic field reversal took far longer than once thought
Every several hundred thousand years or so, Earth's magnetic field dramatically shifts and reverses its polarity.
A new rare metals alloy can change shape in the magnetic field
Scientists developed multifunctional metal alloys that emit and absorb heat at the same time and change their size and volume under the influence of a magnetic field.
Physicists studied the influence of magnetic field on thin film structures
A team of scientists from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University together with their colleagues from Russia, Japan, and Australia studied the influence of inhomogeneity of magnetic field applied during the fabrication process of thin-film structures made from nickel-iron and iridium-manganese alloys, on their properties.
'Magnetic topological insulator' makes its own magnetic field
A team of U.S. and Korean physicists has found the first evidence of a two-dimensional material that can become a magnetic topological insulator even when it is not placed in a magnetic field.
Scientists develop a new way to remotely measure Earth's magnetic field
By zapping a layer of meteor residue in the atmosphere with ground-based lasers, scientists in the US, Canada and Europe get a new view of Earth's magnetic field.
Magnetic field milestone
Physicists from the Institute for Solid State Physics at the University of Tokyo have generated the strongest controllable magnetic field ever produced.
New world record magnetic field
Scientists at the University of Tokyo have recorded the largest magnetic field ever generated indoors -- a whopping 1,200 tesla, as measured in the standard units of magnetic field strength.
Researchers discover link between magnetic field strength and temperature
Researchers recently discovered that the strength of the magnetic field required to elicit a particular quantum mechanical process corresponds to the temperature of the material.
Astronomers observe the magnetic field of the remains of supernova 1987A
For the first time, astronomers have directly observed the magnetism in one of astronomy's most studied objects: the remains of Supernova 1987A (SN 1987A), a dying star that appeared in our skies over thirty years ago.
Watch: Insects also migrate using the Earth's magnetic field
A major international study led by researchers from Lund University in Sweden has proven for the first time that certain nocturnally migrating insects can explore and navigate using the Earth's magnetic field.
More Magnetic Field News and Magnetic Field Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Risk
Why do we revere risk-takers, even when their actions terrify us? Why are some better at taking risks than others? This hour, TED speakers explore the alluring, dangerous, and calculated sides of risk. Guests include professional rock climber Alex Honnold, economist Mariana Mazzucato, psychology researcher Kashfia Rahman, structural engineer and bridge designer Ian Firth, and risk intelligence expert Dylan Evans.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#540 Specialize? Or Generalize?
Ever been called a "jack of all trades, master of none"? The world loves to elevate specialists, people who drill deep into a single topic. Those people are great. But there's a place for generalists too, argues David Epstein. Jacks of all trades are often more successful than specialists. And he's got science to back it up. We talk with Epstein about his latest book, "Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World".
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dolly Parton's America: Neon Moss
Today on Radiolab, we're bringing you the fourth episode of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this episode, Jad goes back up the mountain to visit Dolly's actual Tennessee mountain home, where she tells stories about her first trips out of the holler. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad's first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.