Applied Biosystems introduces new chemistries to increase DNA sequencing productivity

September 24, 2002

FOSTER CITY, CA - September 18, 2002 - Applied Biosystems Group (NYSE:ABI), an Applera Corporation business, today announced the launch of two new versions of its BigDye® Terminator Cycle Sequencing Kit, designed to increase productivity and improve data quality for DNA sequencing applications. These enhanced products are a result of Applied Biosystems' goal to improve sequencing technologies for rapid, accurate and cost effective DNA analysis for studying human and other genomes.

BigDye® Terminator v3.1 Cycle Sequencing Kit is designed for the majority of applications, including de novo sequencing and resequencing. The BigDye® Terminator v1.1 Cycle Sequencing Kit is designed for specialty applications, such as sequencing PCR products associated with comparative sequencing when using a rapid instrument run. Together BigDye® Terminator v3.1 and v1.1 kits are expected to meet the requirements of nearly all sequencing applications performed today. These new formulations are designed to provide researchers with improved performance in sequencing difficult templates, resulting in longer read lengths and higher success rates.

A large percentage of the finishing costs for production-scale sequencing projects are associated with sequencing difficult templates. Some initial customer test sites have reported obtaining an additional 50-100 high-quality bases when using the new chemistries. With a greater ability to sequence difficult templates, customers are expected to be able to complete projects in less time and to lower the overall cost of sequencing projects. Each kit is compatible with Applied Biosystems genetic analysis instruments.

"With the tandem release of these two products, Applied Biosystems should be able to meet the needs of our entire customer base, which is engaged in all types of DNA sequencing applications," said Michael W. Hunkapiller, Ph.D., President of Applied Biosystems. "These products enable longer sequencing reads and higher success rates providing greater capability, which could reduce overall project costs. Decreasing the cost of sequencing is a goal we share with our customers, and we believe these new chemistries will move us further along that path."
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About Applera Corporation and Applied Biosystems
Applera Corporation comprises two operating groups. The Applied Biosystems Group develops and markets instrument-based systems, reagents, software and contract services to the life science industry and research community. Customers use these tools to analyze nucleic acids (DNA and RNA), small molecules, and proteins to make scientific discoveries, leading to the development of new pharmaceuticals and to conduct standardized testing. Applied Biosystems is headquartered in Foster City, CA, and reported sales of $1.6 billion during fiscal 2002. The Celera Genomics Group (NYSE:CRA), located in Rockville, MD and South San Francisco, CA, is engaged principally in integrating advanced technologies to discover and develop new therapeutics. Celera intends to leverage its genomic and proteomics technology platforms to identify drug targets and diagnostic marker candidates and to discover novel therapeutics. Its Celera Discovery SystemTM online platform, marketed exclusively through the Applied Biosystems Knowledge Business, is an integrated source of information based on the human genome and other biological and medical sources. Celera Diagnostics, a 50/50 joint venture between Applied Biosystems and Celera Genomics, is focused on discovery, development and commercialization of novel diagnostics tests. Information about Applera Corporation, including reports and other information filed by the company with the Securities and Exchange Commission, is available on the World Wide Web at http://www.applera.com/, or by telephoning 800.762.6923. Information about Applied Biosystems is available on the World Wide Web at http://www.appliedbiosystems.com.

Certain statements in this press release, including the Outlook section, are forward-looking. These may be identified by the use of forward-looking words or phrases such as "expect and "should" among others. These forward-looking statements are based on Applera Corporation's current expectations. The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 provides a "safe harbor" for such forward-looking statements. In order to comply with the terms of the safe harbor, Applera Corporation notes that a variety of factors could cause actual results and experience to differ materially from the anticipated results or other expectations expressed in such forward-looking statements. The risks include but are not limited to (1) rapidly changing technology and dependence on development of new products; (2) uncertainty of the availability of intellectual property protection and the ability to protect trade secrets, and the risk of infringement claims; and other factors that might be described from time to time in Applera Corporation's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. All information in this press release is as of the date of the release, and Applera does not undertake any duty to update this information, including any forward-looking statements, unless required by law.

Copyright© 2002. Applied Biosystesms. All rights reserved. Applied Biosystems and BigDye are registered trademarks and AB (Design), Applera, Celera, Celera Diagnostics, Celera Discovery System, and Celera Genomics are trademarks of Applera Corporation or its subsidiaries in the U.S. and certain other countries. For Research Use Only. Not for use in diagnostic procedures.

Contacts
Media
Lori Murray
650.638.6130
murrayla@appliedbiosystems.com

Investors
Peter Dworkin
650.554.2479
dworkipg@appliedbiosystems.com

European Media & Investors
David Speechly, Ph.D.
+ 011.44.207.868.1642
speechdp@eur.appliedbiosystems.com

Porter Novelli

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