Brand attitudes improve when product is paired with favorable actor

September 25, 2008

Zurich, Switzerland - September 24, 2008 - Love a rap artist's music, and you may develop fond feelings for the products placed in that artist's rap video. That is essentially the conclusion that a team of investigators came to in an intriguing research article published in this month's issue of Psychology & Marketing (P&M).

After the release of Busta Rhymes and Puff Daddy's Pass the Courvoisier Part Two, a rap music featuring conspicuous product placement of Courvoisier cognac, sales of that beverage jumped 20 percent. That phenomenon got a team of researchers and senior author Christian Schemer thinking about how consumers process brand information presented to them in spot advertising versus how consumers process brand-related information when it is presented in the course of programming (such as music videos).

In their P&M article, they describe a series of experiments designed to explore psychological aspects of consumers' response to brand placement in rap videos.

The researchers concluded that placement of products in programming such as rap videos can be a double-edged sword. On the one hand, positive feelings toward the programming can be transferred to the brand. It's also true that product placement in programming has the benefit of a longer "shelf life" than more traditional advertising. It may also be more globally distributed (at no advertiser expense) and be particularly effective in reaching a targeted demographic.

However, there are potential dangers associated with product placement in programming such as rap videos, not the least of which entails negative feelings aroused by the video being transferred to the brand.
-end-
This study is published in the October 2008 issue of Psychology & Marketing. Media wishing to receive a PDF of this article may contact journalnews@bos.blackwellpublishing.net.

Christian Schemer is affiliated with theUniversity of Zurich and can be reached for questions at ch.schemer@ipmz.uzh.ch.

Psychology & Marketing (P&M) publishes original research and review articles dealing with the application of psychological theories and techniques to marketing. P&M fosters the exploration of marketing phenomena spanning the entire spectrum of offerings (products & services), price, promotion (advertising, publicity, public relations, and personal selling), place (channels and distribution), and politics (public opinion, law, and ethics), all revolving around the individual and collective psyche of consumers.

Wiley-Blackwell was formed in February 2007 as a result of the acquisition of Blackwell Publishing Ltd. by John Wiley & Sons, Inc., and its merger with Wiley's Scientific, Technical, and Medical business. Together, the companies have created a global publishing business with deep strength in every major academic and professional field. Wiley-Blackwell publishes approximately 1,400 scholarly peer-reviewed journals and an extensive collection of books with global appeal. For more information on Wiley-Blackwell, please visit www.blackwellpublishing.com or http://interscience.wiley.com.

Wiley

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