EARTH: How Sandy changed storm warnings

September 25, 2013

Alexandria, VA - Superstorm Sandy slammed against the U.S. Eastern Seaboard in October 2012, inundating iconic communities. Those communities have been rebuilding since then and things are almost back to normal for most. But something else has had to be rebuilt as well: the structured procedures for issuing warnings. The goal is to help communities better comprehend what natural disasters will bring their doorsteps.

In an October feature story, EARTH Magazine untangles the complexities scientists faced to motivate local residents to pack up and move. The rigid definition of what type of storm Sandy was when it made landfall limited which officials could issue warnings and which warnings they could issue. This situation was further complicated by human psychology -- different warning agencies have different clout with the general public, and the general public's past experiences shaped the expectations of millions that the looming danger would blow over like many storms in historical memory.

Not only was Sandy "a perfect storm," but the conditions to communicate valuable life-saving information were too. EARTH Magazine examines how scientists rose to the occasion despite their circumstances and how they have developed new tools to protect the public during future storms: http://bit.ly/16oK0yg. EARTH Magazine also brings you screaming volcanoes, the possibility of greener gold extraction and a striking view of Wyoming's Devil's Tower at the digital bookstand http://www.earthmagazine.org/digital.
-end-
Keep up to date with the latest happenings in Earth, energy and the environment news with EARTH magazine online at http://www.earthmagazine.org/. Published by the American Geosciences Institute, EARTH is your source for the science behind the headlines.

The American Geosciences Institute is a nonprofit federation of geoscientific and professional associations that represents more than 250,000 geologists, geophysicists and other earth scientists. Founded in 1948, AGI provides information services to geoscientists, serves as a voice of shared interests in the profession, plays a major role in strengthening geosciences education, and strives to increase public awareness of the vital role geosciences play in society's use of resources, resiliency to natural hazards, and interaction with the environment.

American Geosciences Institute

Related Communities Articles from Brightsurf:

Identifying communities at risk for impacts of extreme heat
An analysis of ways to measure a community's vulnerability to climate change suggests that California's current method may leave some at-risk communities behind in efforts to reduce health impacts of extreme heat.

Fipronil, a common insecticide, disrupts aquatic communities in the U.S.
The research team found a common insecticide, fipronil, and related compounds were more toxic to stream communities than previous research has found.

Invasional meltdown in multi-species plant communities
New research led by University of Konstanz ecologists reveals invasional meltdown in multi-species plant communities and identifies the soil microbiome as a major driver of invasion success.

Global warming is changing our plant communities
In a comprehensive study of nearly 20,000 species, University of Miami research shows that plant communities are shifting to include more heat-loving species as a result of climate change.

Half of low-income communities have no ICU beds
A new Penn Medicine study sheds light on yet another reason why the coronavirus pandemic is disproportionately killing the poor: Residents in low-income neighborhoods lack access to intensive care unit (ICU) beds.

Simulating cooperation in local communities
In new research published in EPJ B, a new simulation-based approach is introduced which could help to reduce the proportion of people who misuse welfare payoffs, through a cost-effective system which rewards individuals who use them responsibly.

Urban heat waves imperil LA's most vulnerable communities
Some of LA's most disadvantaged communities are vulnerable to extreme heat waves, which are increasingly common due to global warming.

More youth suicide found in poor communities across US
A study led by Jennifer Hoffmann, M.D., from Ann & Robert H.

Climate change is reshaping communities of ocean organisms
Climate change is reshaping communities of fish and other sea life, according to a pioneering study on how ocean warming is affecting the mix of species.

Communities must band together to protect against bushfires
As Australia confronts devastating bushfire conditions, people across the nation are doing all they can to ensure the safety of their homes, property and loved ones.

Read More: Communities News and Communities Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.