Most patients take less than two minutes to tell their story

September 26, 2002

Doctors should let patients talk without interruption at the start of a consultation, a study in this week's BMJ suggests.

Research in America has shown that doctors take the lead in a consultation on average after 22 seconds, probably because they believe it would be time-consuming to allow patients to talk uninterrupted. Doctors in Switzerland set out to test this assumption.

Patients at an outpatient clinic in Basle were asked to talk spontaneously about their complaints and indicate when they had finished. Their doctors were instructed to time them on a hidden stopwatch and not to interrupt until the patient said "What do you think, doctor?"

The average spontaneous talking time was 92 seconds and 78% of patients had finished within two minutes. Sex and social status did not influence the results, but older patients tended to talk for longer.

In all cases the doctors believed that their patients were providing important information and did not feel the need to interrupt them.

The authors conclude that doctors do not risk drowning in their patients' complaints if they let them talk spontaneously. Even in a busy practice doctors should be able to listen for two minutes, which will be sufficient for most patients.

Furthermore, the data was gathered in a referral centre characterised by patients with complex problems. Patients in other groups may need even less time to tell their story.
-end-


BMJ

Related Social Status Articles from Brightsurf:

Psychological status rather than cognitive status is associated with incorrect perception of risk of falling in patients with moderate stage dementia
Dementia is associated with an impaired self-perception with potentially harmful consequences for health status and clinical risk classification in this patient group with an extraordinary high risk of falling.

Effect of hydroxychloroquine on clinical status
This randomized trial compares the effects of hydroxychloroquine versus placebo on patients' clinical status at 14 days (home, requiring noninvasive or invasive ventilation or extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, hospitalized, died) among adults hospitalized with COVID-19.

'Social cells' related to social behavior identified in the brain
A research team led by Professor TAKUMI Toru of Kobe University's Graduate School of Medicine (also a Senior Visiting Scientist at RIKEN Center for Biosystems Dynamics Research) have identified 'social cells' in the brain that are related to social behavior.

Behaviors and traits that influence social status, according to evolutionary psychologists
Beyond fame and fortune, certain traits and behaviors may have pervasive influence in climbing the social ladder, according to a study by evolutionary psychologists at The University of Texas at Austin.

Social media influencers could encourage adolescents to follow social distancing guidelines
Public health bodies should consider incentivizing social media influencers to encourage adolescents to follow social distancing guidelines, say researchers.

Social grooming factors influencing social media civility on COVID-19
A new study analyzing tweets about COVID-19 found that users with larger social networks tend to use fewer uncivil remarks when they have more positive responses from others.

The status of women
What drives people seek to high social status? A common evolutionary explanation suggests men do so because, in the past, they were able to leverage their social position into producing more children and propagating their genes.

Social isolation during adolescence drives long-term disruptions in social behavior
Mount Sinai Researchers find social isolation during key developmental windows drives long term changes to activity patterns of neurons involved in initiating social approach in an animal model.

How status sticks to genes
Life at the bottom of the social ladder may have long-term health effects that even upward mobility can't undo, according to new research in monkeys.

Social media stress can lead to social media addiction
Social network users risk becoming more and more addicted to social media platforms even as they experience stress from their use.

Read More: Social Status News and Social Status Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.