Launch of AZojomo - AZo Journal Of Materials Online

September 26, 2005

In a radical departure from the traditional scientific publishing model, Azojomo [http://www.azom.com/azojomo.asp] will reward authors and peer reviewers for their work by paying a share of advertising revenue attributable to their content. AZojomo represents a revolution in scientific publishing that will provide maximum impact for authors by linking their material to the most highly visited materials science site in the world, AZoM.com, which currently experiences more than 600,000 visitor sessions every month. AZojomo is free to view for all site visitors and costs nothing for authors to have their material peer reviewed and published.

AZojomo represents a revolution in scientific publishing that will provide maximum impact for authors by linking their material to the most highly visited materials science site in the world, AZoM.com, which currently experiences more than 600,000 visitor sessions every month. AZojomo is free to view for all site visitors and costs nothing for authors to have their material peer reviewed and published.

This is the first time anywhere in the world that scientists can be directly rewarded for the publication of their research papers. AZojomo is based on a business method and system called the Open Access Reward System (OARS), which provides an equitable distribution of rewards to both authors and peer reviewers by a revenue sharing arrangement. OARS has been developed by AZoM.com and is subject to patent, with international patents pending.

According to AZoM.com founder and Managing Director, Dr Ian Birkby, "OARS is the right way to encourage true open access to materials science and represents for authors a significant improvement over the existing model. We believe that AZojomo, powered by OARS, will encourage rapid publication of the latest scientific ideas and will make access much wider, much easier and more inclusive."

All material submitted for publishing will be peer-reviewed by a panel of internationally renowned materials science experts, ensuring the credibility of the journal and the papers it contains. Materials scientists and engineers have traditionally had to rely on a closed shop of publishing houses to publish research papers, a process that is time consuming, expensive and slow to connect valuable content with potential audiences.

AZojomo will make scientific publishing easier and more accessible than ever before while ensuring that quality and a rigorous reviewing process are maintained.

Dr Birkby says that the "AZojomo will be open to all and we truly hope that it will become the publishing method of choice for materials scientists and engineers across the globe."

AZoM.com is part of the AZoNetwork - a network of specialist science and technology portals covering materials science, medical science, nanotechnology, and building technology.
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See [http://www.azom.com/azojomo.asp] and [http://www.azom.com]

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