Contraception: progress brings hope for new methods for men

September 27, 2007

For decades, pundits have predicted new contraceptives for men within the next 5 to 10 years. Are we really getting any closer? Judging from work presented today at the second "Future of Male Contraception" conference, the answer may finally be yes.

But will men actually use a new method if researchers make one? Elaine Lissner, director of the nonprofit Male Contraception Information Project, says demand is the least of the problems. "You'll never have all men interested, but attitudes have really changed-- studies consistenly show a majority of men would consider it. You have to remember, between condoms and vasectomy, men in the U.S. are already taking care of a third of contraception. Just imagine if they had another non-permanent option."

Kirsten Thompson, director of the International Male Contraception Coalition, concurs. "Some men are quite desperate for better control over their fertility. They're looking for something they can really count on."

Among the developments announced at the conference:Researchers from around the world are also announcing new targets for contraception, and incremental progress on hormonal approaches ("the male Pill"). Many other teams will present late-breaking news during the poster session, 7-9 pm the 27th.
-end-
For further information, see the conference website: http://www.futureofmalecontraception.com

The Future of Male Contraception
September 27-28, 2007
Edgewater Hotel
Seattle, Washington

Registration and Information:
www.futureofmalecontraception.com

Meeting sponsored by:
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, CONRAD, World Health Organization, University of Washington

The Male Contraception Information Project (MCIP) is entirely nonprofit and works in three areas: raising public awareness of promising nonhormonal male contraceptives, advocating increased and expedited government research, and serving as a resource for journalists who wish to write about the subject. MCIP will be in attendance at the Future of Male Contraception conference and sending out press releases about selected developments. More resources for journalists are available from MCIP at www.NewMaleContraception.org.

Male Contraception Information Project

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