Cedars-Sinai Pathology and Laboratory Medicine chair recognized with 2 of the field's top honors

September 27, 2010

LOS ANGELES (SEPTEMBER 27, 2010) - The College of American Pathologists has honored Mahul B. Amin, M.D., FCAP, chairman of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, with two awards for outstanding leadership and contributions in the field of pathology.

Amin was presented with both the College of Pathologists Distinguished Service Award and the College of Pathologists Foundation's Lansky Award at a ceremony in Chicago at the organization's annual scientific meeting. It is rare in the history of the College that a pathologist has been honored with both awards in the same year.

One of the nation's recognized authorities in prostate cancer pathology and oncologic pathology, Amin has written more than 244 articles in peer-reviewed journals, and has co-authored seven books, including two Armed Forces Institute of Pathology manuals.

The Lansky Award, in honor of Herbert Lansky, M.D., is presented to a board certified pathologist who has demonstrated leadership consistent with the goals of the CAP Foundation of promoting science and education in the field of pathology resulting in innovative improvements to patient care, identifying critical issues that affect the field and the public, and educating colleagues in the field and the public about pathology research.

"Dr. Mahul Amin's contributions to the field of pathology are truly remarkable, and span the entire spectrum of the field from research, to clinical practice, to key roles in standards and guideline development," said CAP Foundation President-Elect Jennifer L. Hunt, M.D., FCAP. "Dr. Amin embodies the mission of the Foundation, providing the best in patient-centered diagnostic service. We are so pleased to honor Dr. Amin with the Lansky Award, as a testament to his dedication to pathology and to patients."

The CAP Distinguished Service Award recognizes outstanding contributions to the practice of pathology and to the organization. Dr. Amin was honored with the award for his collaborative work in developing the CAP Cancer Protocols. The updated CAP Cancer Protocols, released late last year, serve to ensure standardization of pathology reporting throughout the United States for better patient care, and allow data to be more easily communicated and compared, which supports research efforts. The role of the pathologist in diagnosing cancer continues to expand as personalized medicine advances. The Cancer Protocols will be important tools to help pathologists worldwide rise to this challenge. Thanks to Amin's efforts, the cancer protocols are used widely throughout the world, including in Australia, Canada, and Asia.

"It is with great pleasure that we recognize Dr. Mahul Amin for his outstanding contributions to both the practice of pathology and to the College of American Pathologists," said CAP President Stephen N. Bauer, M.D., FCAP.
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The College of American Pathologists is a medical society serving more than 17,000 physician members and the laboratory community throughout the world. It is the world's largest association composed exclusively of board-certified pathologists and is widely considered the leader in laboratory quality assurance.

The College of American Pathologists Foundation promotes science and education in an effort to improve the delivery of pathology services to patients and expand medical research and funding of individual research projects through sponsorship of the Scholars Research Fellowship Program.

In addition to serving as chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Amin is also a professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

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