Nav: Home

How old does your computer think you are?

September 27, 2017

Computerised face recognition is an important part of initiatives to develop security systems, in building social networks, in curating photographs, and many other applications. Systems that allow a computer to estimate with precision a person's age based on an analysis of their face are discussed in the International Journal of Applied Pattern Recognition.

Jayant Jagtap and Manesh Kokare of the Department of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering, at the Shri Guru Gobind Singhji Institute of Engineering and Technology, in Vishnupuri, Nanded, India, suggest that age classification adds a useful layer to such security systems, customer relationship management, and of course for surveillance. The team has carried out a detailed survey of age classification systems to reveal the pros and cons of each and to point new research in the right direction for the development of an even more accurate algorithm than any that currently exists. Indeed, their survey reveals that despite the best efforts of developers there is no real-time highly accurate algorithm for age classification yet in existence. The existing age classification systems commonly use geometric ratios of facial features and analysis of wrinkles in the skin.

One of the problems facing developers of such a tool is that databases containing images of a person's face tend not to accumulate images at different ages. This limits how well an algorithm might be trained based on a database of photos at known ages. While there are many serious tools and many spurious or fun tools available on the internet, there are no public systems that allow a computer to guess how old you are with useful accuracy. This may well be a positive point to make from the personal privacy point of view but not for the wider implications of face recognition and age categorization.
-end-
Jagtap, J. and Kokare, M. (2017) 'Human age classification via face images: a survey', Int. J. Applied Pattern Recognition, Vol. 4, No. 3, pp.246-260.

Inderscience Publishers

Related Engineering Articles:

Engineering the meniscus
Damage to the meniscus is common, but there remains an unmet need for improved restorative therapies that can overcome poor healing in the avascular regions.
Artificially engineering the intestine
Short bowel syndrome is a debilitating condition with few treatment options, and these treatments have limited efficacy.
Reverse engineering the fireworks of life
An interdisciplinary team of Princeton researchers has successfully reverse engineered the components and sequence of events that lead to microtubule branching.
New method for engineering metabolic pathways
Two approaches provide a faster way to create enzymes and analyze their reactions, leading to the design of more complex molecules.
Engineering for high-speed devices
A research team from the University of Delaware has developed cutting-edge technology for photonics devices that could enable faster communications between phones and computers.
Breakthrough in blood vessel engineering
Growing functional blood vessel networks is no easy task. Previously, other groups have made networks that span millimeters in size.
Next-gen batteries possible with new engineering approach
Dramatically longer-lasting, faster-charging and safer lithium metal batteries may be possible, according to Penn State research, recently published in Nature Energy.
What can snakes teach us about engineering friction?
If you want to know how to make a sneaker with better traction, just ask a snake.
Engineering a plastic-eating enzyme
Scientists have engineered an enzyme which can digest some of our most commonly polluting plastics, providing a potential solution to one of the world's biggest environmental problems.
A new way to do metabolic engineering
University of Illinois researchers have created a novel metabolic engineering method that combines transcriptional activation, transcriptional interference, and gene deletion, and executes them simultaneously, making the process faster and easier.
More Engineering News and Engineering Current Events

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2019.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Accessing Better Health
Essential health care is a right, not a privilege ... or is it? This hour, TED speakers explore how we can give everyone access to a healthier way of life, despite who you are or where you live. Guests include physician Raj Panjabi, former NYC health commissioner Mary Bassett, researcher Michael Hendryx, and neuroscientist Rachel Wurzman.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#543 Give a Nerd a Gift
Yup, you guessed it... it's Science for the People's annual holiday episode that helps you figure out what sciency books and gifts to get that special nerd on your list. Or maybe you're looking to build up your reading list for the holiday break and a geeky Christmas sweater to wear to an upcoming party. Returning are pop-science power-readers John Dupuis and Joanne Manaster to dish on the best science books they read this past year. And Rachelle Saunders and Bethany Brookshire squee in delight over some truly delightful science-themed non-book objects for those whose bookshelves are already full. Since...
Now Playing: Radiolab

An Announcement from Radiolab