Laboratory professionals in Africa receive training under AIDS Relief Plan

September 28, 2005

CHICAGO (September 28, 2005) - The American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) announced that the Society will receive approximately $1.5 million in federal funds to continue to provide laboratory training and quality improvement programs in African countries severely affected by AIDS. The training programs are for medical laboratory professionals in Africa and will continue in 2006 through the President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief.

The funding comes from the United States Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (HHS/CDC). The money will allow the Chicago-based ASCP to continue its involvement in a cooperative agreement program with CDC. ASCP's role in the program is to provide laboratory training and quality improvement programs for diagnosis and laboratory monitoring of HIV/AIDS patients in resource-limited countries as part of the Emergency Plan.

"Ultimately, this program will serve to enhance laboratory testing practices and the quality of laboratory testing services, in order to improve the effectiveness of HIV diagnostic, care, and treatment services and interventions," said LoAnn Peterson, MD, FASCP, ASCP President. The award will be made for a 12-month budget period, within a project period of up to four years.

The Emergency Plan is a $15 billion international relief effort. In addition to Ethiopia and Zambia, targeted nations include Botswana, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Haiti, Guyana, Zambia, Lesotho, Swaziland and Viet Nam. ASCP will be working in Ethiopia, Tanzania, South Africa, Zambia, Lesotho and Swaziland.

In the past year, 14 ASCP volunteer members have played roles assessing the situation in Africa, serving as trainers, and participating in Work Groups developing training materials.

Estimates are that some 40 million people are living with HIV/AIDS in developing nations. In Zambia, for instance, some 1.2 million people are affected by the condition. The disease has affected nearly one in five adults and orphaned 650,000 children. In Ethiopia, government officials estimate that more than four million citizens are infected with the HIV virus and about one-third of all Ethiopian hospital beds are occupied by HIV carriers.
-end-
For more information, visit www.ascp.org/Downloadables1/WebTextItems/10299.asp.

American Society for Clinical Pathology

Related Aids Articles from Brightsurf:

Developing a new vaccination strategy against AIDS
Infection researchers from the German Primate Center (DPZ) -- Leibniz Institute for Primate Research have in cooperation with international colleagues tested a new vaccination strategy against the HIV-related simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in rhesus monkeys.

HIV-AIDS: Following your gut
Researchers find a way to reduce replication of the AIDS virus in the gastrointestinal tract.

A path toward ending AIDS in the US by 2025
Using prevention surveillance data to model rates of HIV incidence, prevalence and mortality, investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health set targets, specifically a decrease in new infections to 21,000 by 2020 and to 12,000 by 2025, that would mark a transition toward ending the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

What does it take for an AIDS virus to infect a person?
Researchers examined the characteristics of HIV-1 strains that were successful in traversing the genital mucosa that forms a boundary to entry by viruses and bacteria.

How AIDS conquered North America
A new technique that allowed researchers to analyze genetic material from serum samples of HIV patients taken before AIDS was known provides a glimpse of unprecedented detail into the beginnings of the AIDS epidemic in North America.

New research could help build better hearing aids
Scientists at Binghamton University, State University of New York want to improve sensor technology critical to billions of devices made every year.

NY State Department of Health AIDS Institute funds HIV/AIDS prevention in high-risk youth
NewYork-Presbyterian's Comprehensive Health Program and Project STAY, an initiative of the Harlem Heath Promotion Center (HHPC) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health has received two grants totaling more than $3.75 million from the New York State Department of Health AIDS Institute for their continued efforts to prevent HIV/AIDS in at-risk youth.

A new way to nip AIDS in the bud
When new HIV particles bud from an infected cell, the enzyme protease activates to help the viruses infect more cells.

AIDS research prize for Warwick academic
A researcher at the University of Warwick has received international recognition for his contribution to AIDS research.

Insects inspire next generation of hearing aids
An insect-inspired microphone that can tackle the problem of locating sounds and eliminate background noise is set to revolutionize modern-day hearing aid systems.

Read More: Aids News and Aids Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.