Leading experts cite poor health and nutrition as major barrier to education in developing world

September 28, 2007

The book (School Health, Nutrition and Education for All) argues that the education of children will greatly improve if the programmes to improve health and nutrition, which have reduced major diseases in poor communities, are replicated across the developing world.

Matthew Jukes, one of the book's authors says:

"By treating or preventing diseases and improving nutrition in schools, we'd go a long way to enabling children in poor countries to achieve their educational potential."

Many of the challenges in providing education to children throughout the poorer countries of the world - such as making sure they have quality learning materials and effective teachers - are complex and costly to address, particularly in poor communities. By contrast, tackling many common health problems is inexpensive and straightforward and has the greatest benefits for the poorest children.

Previous methods of delivering treatments relied on proximity to urban centres, far from the marginalized poor. In contrast, services delivered through schools have a built-in mechanism to ensure sustainability and reach the children who need them most.

At present millions of children in the developing world are missing out on essential schooling or are unable to learn to their full capacity. One half of all school age children have iron deficiency anaemia, one half are stunted due to poor nutrition and one third are infected with worms.

These illnesses, although debilitating, are easily treatable. Treatment is also extremely cost effective -for example it costs less than $0.10 to treat a child for intestinal worms.

Matthew Jukes highlights the difference that effective treatment can make:

"Early childhood malaria prevention in the Gambia led to children staying at school for 1 year longer; de-worming in Kenya increased school attendance by 7%; and iron supplementation in Indonesia improved children's cognitive abilities by the equivalent of 8 IQ points. The evidence is clear that good health and nutrition helps children spend more time at school and learn more effectively while there."

The book gives a compelling case for school health and nutrition programmes as a 'quick win', highly cost effective, pro-poor, sustainable initiative which can have massive global impact. The authors hope to convince readers that school health and nutrition programmes "really are an urgent education policy priority for all poor countries."

The book School health, Nutrition and Education for All is published by CABI on 12th November 2007. To pre-order your copy please contact CABI Customer Services on 44-1491-829400 or email orders@cabi.org.
-end-
Editors Notes:

CABI

CABI is a not for profit organisation that improves people's lives worldwide by providing information and applying scientific expertise to solve problems in agriculture and the environment. Its mission and direction is influenced by its 45 member countries who help guide the activities undertaken as a business. These include scientific publishing, projects and consultancy, information for development and mycological services. CABI's activities contribute directly to achieving Global Development Objectives, particularly those concerned with poverty reduction, environmental sustainability and partnership for development.

For more information on CABI go to www.cabi.org

CABI Publications and Resources

CABI is a world-leading publisher of bibliographic databases, books, and interactive electronic resources aiming to further science and its application to real life. Behind each of our products is a team of subject specialists committed to delivering the most relevant and authoritative information to researchers worldwide. Our expertise includes animal sciences, entomology, plant sciences, environmental sciences, human health, parasitology, mycology, crop protection, rural economics, rural development, and leisure and tourism.

CABI

Related Nutrition Articles from Brightsurf:

Here's how to improve packaged foods nutrition
FOP nutrition labeling results in a significant improvement in the nutritional quality of food products.

'Front of package' nutrition labels improved nutrition quality
A new study analyzing 16 years of data on tens of thousands of products finds that the adoption of nutrition data on ''front of package'' labels is associated with improved nutritional content of those foods and their competitors.

Aquaculture's role in nutrition in the COVID-19 era
A new paper from American University examines the economics of an aquaculture industry of the future that is simultaneously environmentally sustainable and nutritious for the nearly 1 billion people worldwide who depend on it.

Fathers are more likely to be referred for nutrition or exercise counseling
Fatherhood status has been linked to medical providers' weight-related practices or counseling referrals.

Refugee children get better health, nutrition via e-vouchers
Electronic food vouchers provided young Rohingya children in Bangladeshi refugee camps with better health and nutrition than direct food assistance, according to new research led by Cornell University, in conjunction with the International Food Policy Research Institute.

Leaders call for 'Moonshot' on nutrition research
Leading nutrition and food policy experts outline a bold case for strengthening federal nutrition research in a live interactive session as part of NUTRITION 2020 LIVE ONLINE, a virtual conference hosted by the American Society for Nutrition (ASN).

Featured research from NUTRITION 2020 LIVE ONLINE
Press materials are now available for NUTRITION 2020 LIVE ONLINE, a dynamic virtual event showcasing new research findings and timely discussions on food and nutrition.

Diet, nutrition have profound effects on gut microbiome
A new literature review from scientists at George Washington University and the National Institute of Standards and Technology suggests that nutrition and diet have a profound impact on the microbial composition of the gut.

Are women getting adequate nutrition during preconception and pregnancy?
In a Maternal & Child Nutrition analysis of published studies on the dietary habits of women who were trying to conceive or were pregnant, most studies indicated that women do not meet nutritional recommendations for vegetable, cereal grain, or folate intake.

Supermarkets and child nutrition in Africa
Hunger and undernutrition are widespread problems in Africa. At the same time, overweight, obesity, and related chronic diseases are also on the rise.

Read More: Nutrition News and Nutrition Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.