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Snoring kids, abnormal sleep time and NIH funding

September 28, 2015

Dallas, TX--Among the new research to be presented tomorrow at the 2015 Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO of the American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) in Dallas are several studies about sleep health. The studies touch on risk factors for children with sleep apnea, the effects of getting too little or too much sleep, and funding trends for obstructive sleep apnea.

Pediatric OSA: Demographic Predictors of Severity
How do the sleep studies of children from different backgrounds compare, and what are the risk factors associated with obstructive sleep apnea severity?
Abstract: http://oto.sagepub.com/content/153/1_suppl/P145.full#sec-18

Abnormal Sleep Time and the Risk of Accidental Injury
Most adults sleep between 7- 8 hours nightly. Adults with sleep time outside this range, either less or more sleep, have increased rates of accidental injury.
Abstract: http://oto.sagepub.com/content/153/1_suppl/P145.full#sec-1

National Institutes of Health Funding for Obstructive Sleep Apnea
What are the current levels and trends of funding for the National Institutes of Health in obstructive sleep apnea?
Abstract: http://oto.sagepub.com/content/153/1_suppl/P145.full#sec-16

The Annual Meeting, which runs through noon on Wednesday, features new research findings from across all areas of the otolaryngology specialty. A full searchable schedule for the Annual Meeting is online at http://www.entannualmeeting.org. Abstracts of all the research to be presented are available at http://oto.sagepub.com/content/153/1_suppl.toc.

Information for the Media

The AAO-HNSF offers press registration, newsroom workspace, and interview facilitation for credentialed members of the news media. Research abstracts are available in advance of the meeting but in-depth content and quotes collected from author interviews are embargoed until the date and time of presentation at the Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO. Interested news media may request author interviews by contacting newsroom@entnet.org. Additional information can be found online at http://www.entnet.org/content/press-information.

The Newsroom, located across the Kay Bailey Hutchison Convention Center Sky Bridge in Room Arts District 7 of the Omni Hotel, will
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About the AAO-HNS/F

The American Academy of Otolaryngology--Head and Neck Surgery, one of the oldest medical associations in the nation, represents about 12,000 physicians and allied health professionals who specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the ears, nose, throat, and related structures of the head and neck. The Academy serves its members by facilitating the advancement of the science and art of medicine related to otolaryngology and by representing the specialty in governmental and socioeconomic issues. The AAO-HNS Foundation works to advance the art, science, and ethical practice of otolaryngology-head and neck surgery through education, research, and lifelong learning. The organization's vision: "Empowering otolaryngologist-head and neck surgeons to deliver the best patient care."

American Academy of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery

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