How does this blue flower tea change color? (video)

September 28, 2020

WASHINGTON, Sept. 28, 2020 -- Maybe you've seen a beautiful, color-changing tea on social media. Chances are, it's butterfly pea flower tea. This week, we're investigating what allows it to shift from one vibrant color to the next, and Sam and George play around to see how many different colors they can get: https://youtu.be/ORl6EKQI1ws.
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