Open access initiative from the Company of Biologists

September 29, 2003

The Company of Biologists announces that - from January 2004 - its journals - Development, Journal of Cell Science and The Journal of Experimental Biology - will be offering authors the option of 'open access'.

In response to the biological community's drive for freedom of access to scientific research, The Company of Biologists will offer authors the choice to have their work published free of charge (in the usual way) or as an author-funded open access paper. Open access is a new mode of publishing, which removes the subscription barrier and allows all internet users completely free access to the material. Authors choosing to take advantage of the open access alternative will be charged a publication fee, which, as an introductory offer, will be heavily subsidised by the Company of Biologists.

The Company of Biologists will offer this author-funded publication model for a trial period of one year. The traditional subscription model will operate in parallel as part of a hybrid publishing experiment. Authors will be asked to make the decision as to whether to take advantage of the open access offer when their papers are accepted. Those choosing the company's traditional free publication alternative will still benefit from no page charges, no colour charges, and free access to papers after 6 months.

As a small not-for-profit publisher, The Company of Biologists relies on subscription revenue to cover its publishing costs and to fulfil its charitable remit. However, this experiment with an open access publishing model is an important development, allowing authors increased flexibility and choice. The Company of Biologists is dedicated to its continuing financial support for the community through grants, travelling fellowships and sponsorship.
-end-
For further information visit www.biologists.com/web/openaccess.html

Or write to: Executive Editor, The Company of Biologists Ltd, Bidder Building, 140 Cowley Road,
Cambridge, CB4 0DL, UK.
Tel: +44 (0)1223 420482
Fax: +44 (0)1223 423353
E-mail: cob@biologists.com

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