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Organoid research revealed at Neuroscience 2019

September 30, 2019

Mini-brains, also called organoids, may offer breakthroughs in clinical research by allowing scientists to study human brain cells without a human subject. Hear leading scientists announce their new findings at Neuroscience 2019, the world's largest source of emerging news and cutting-edge research on the brain and nervous system.

Watch a press conference on organoids Oct. 22, 2019, 10 a.m. CDT via live stream or in person in Chicago. Credentialed media receive complimentary registration to Neuroscience 2019 and access to online and on-site press rooms, top neuroscientists, embargoed press materials, and special events, providing a rich collection of news and feature possibilities.

Register for Neuroscience 2019 here and visit our online press room.

Brain in a Dish: The Viability of Organoids

Tuesday, October 22, 10 a.m. - 11 a.m. CDT

A prevailing challenge in the field of neuroscience is studying simplified animal models in order to learn about the human brain. Animal models enable experiments not possible in humans, but do not replicate the diversity and complexity of the human cortex. Human stem cells cultured in a dish, called organoids, offer a novel way to study the human brain without needing a human subject. Researchers will discuss strengths and weaknesses of organoids as a model for the human cortex and how it has already been employed to study developmental brain disorders.
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About the Society for Neuroscience

The Society for Neuroscience is the world's largest organization of scientists and physicians devoted to understanding the brain and nervous system. The nonprofit organization, founded in 1969, now has nearly 37,000 members in more than 90 countries and over 130 chapters worldwide.

Society for Neuroscience

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