SNM sharpens focus on molecular imaging innovation and translation

October 01, 2010

Reston, Va.-- SNM's Molecular Imaging Center of Excellence (MICoE) is changing its name effective Oct. 1, 2010, to the Center for Molecular Imaging Innovation and Translation (CMIIT), a designation that reflects its new mission and vision.

"The MICoE was created five years ago to help integrate all aspects of molecular imaging into the structure and mission of SNM," said Carolyn J. Anderson, Ph.D., president of MICoE, now CMIIT, and a professor of radiology, biochemistry & molecular biophysics and chemistry at Washington University in St. Louis. "Since that time, SNM has evolved into a society that welcomes and integrates all molecular imaging modalities. This led the center to narrow its focus--reflected in its new vision, mission and name--to the innovation and translation of molecular imaging techniques."

CMIIT's mission is to engage the molecular imaging community and leverage the SNM infrastructure to advance the adoption of emerging molecular imaging technologies and probes in preclinical and clinical applications. The guiding vision for CMIIT is for molecular imaging to become an integral part of the medical standard of care by providing specific information that will be used for diagnosis and to guide therapeutic decisions that improve health and well-being.

By collaborating with academic centers, industry, and philanthropic and government agencies, CMIIT will help establish a pathway for integrating emerging molecular imaging technologies into basic science, drug discovery, clinical trials and routine practice.

"CMIIT will place a major focus on translational research--moving basic science in molecular imaging into clinical practice," said Dominique Delbeke, M.D., Ph.D., president of SNM and the director of nuclear medicine and positron emission tomography in the Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. "These continuing efforts will make SNM and CMIIT an effective advocate, a comprehensive educational resource and a welcoming organizational home for all molecular imaging professionals."

SNM established the MICoE five years ago to spearhead the evolution of the society as it diversified and increased support for innovative research and high-quality educational opportunities for all molecular imaging modalities. MICoE has worked to increase awareness of molecular imaging technologies and procedures among scientific, physician, and patient groups, and to advocate for molecular imaging with government agencies and policymakers. MICoE also proposed new grants and awards for molecular imaging research that are now offered through SNM and its Education and Research Foundation.
-end-
About SNM--Advancing Molecular Imaging and Therapy

SNM is an international scientific and medical organization dedicated to raising public awareness about what molecular imaging is and how it can help provide patients with the best health care possible. SNM members specialize in molecular imaging, a vital element of today's medical practice that adds an additional dimension to diagnosis, changing the way common and devastating diseases are understood and treated.

SNM's more than 17,000 members set the standard for molecular imaging and nuclear medicine practice by creating guidelines, sharing information through journals and meetings, and leading advocacy on key issues that affect molecular imaging in diagnosis, therapy, research, and practice. For more information, visit http://www.snm.org.

Society of Nuclear Medicine

Related Clinical Trials Articles from Brightsurf:

Nearly 1 in 5 cancer patients less likely to enroll in clinical trials during pandemic
A significant portion of cancer patients may be less likely to enroll in a clinical trial due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

COVID-19 clinical trials lack diversity
Despite disproportionately higher rates of COVID-19 infection, hospitalization and death among people of color, minority groups are significantly underrepresented in COVID-19 clinical trials.

Why we should trust registered clinical trials
In a time when we have to rely on clinical trials for COVID-19 drugs and vaccines, a new study brings good news about the credibility of registered clinical trials.

Inclusion of children in clinical trials of treatments for COVID-19
This Viewpoint discusses the exclusion of children from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) clinical trials and why that could harm treatment options for children.

Review evaluates how AI could boost the success of clinical trials
In a review publishing July 17, 2019 in the journal Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, researchers examined how artificial intelligence (AI) could affect drug development in the coming decade.

Kidney patients are neglected in clinical trials
The exclusion of patients with kidney diseases from clinical trials remains an unsolved problem that hinders optimal care of these patients.

Clinical trials beginning for possible preeclampsia treatment
For over 20 years, a team of researchers at Lund University has worked on developing a drug against preeclampsia -- a serious disorder which annually affects around 9 million pregnant women worldwide and is one of the main causes of death in both mothers and unborn babies.

Underenrollment in clinical trials: Patients not the problem
The authors of the study published this month in the Journal of Clinical Oncology investigated why many cancer clinical trials fail to enroll enough patients.

When designing clinical trials for huntington's disease, first ask the experts
Progress in understanding the genetic mutation responsible for Huntington's disease (HD) and at least some molecular underpinnings of the disease has resulted in a new era of clinical testing of potential treatments.

New ALS therapy in clinical trials
New research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St.

Read More: Clinical Trials News and Clinical Trials Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.