New best practices recommended for feeding tube location verification in pediatric patients

October 01, 2018

PHILADELPHIA (October 1, 2018) - Placement of nasogastric (NG) tubes (feeding tubes) in pediatric patients is a common practice, however, the insertion procedure carries risk of serious or even potentially lethal complications. While there are numerous methods of verifying an NG tube has been placed correctly, none of those methods are considered universally standard.

Based on the available evidence and endorsed by the American Society for Parental and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) best practice recommendations related to NG tube location verification in pediatric patients are now available online as a special report in the journal Nutrition in Clinical Practice. These recommendations are meant to supplement professional training and include:"These recommendations are a necessary first step in establishing best practice related to NG tube placement and verification in the pediatric patient in order to improve patient safety," said Penn Nursing's Sharon Y. Irving, PhD, CRNP, FCCM, FAAN, Assistant Professor of Pediatric Nursing in the Department of Family and Community Health, and a Nurse Practitioner in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Irving is the lead author on these recommendations.
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Co-authors on the recommendations paper include Gina Rempel, MD, FRCPC of the University of Manitoba and Children's Hospital, Winnipeg; Beth Lyman, RN, MSN, CNSC, FASPEN of Children's Mercy Hospital in Missouri; Wednesday Marie A. Sevilla, MD, MPH, CNSC, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh; LaDonna Northington, DNS, RN, BC, University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Nursing; and Peggi Guenter, PhD, RN, FAAN, FASPEN of The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

These recommendations have been developed as part of the NOVEL Project, which was launched to address an important issue--what is the best practice to verify NG feeding tube location in pediatrics? NG tube misplacement can cause serious harm and/or death to patients. X-rays can be used to verify proper tube placement, but with pediatric patients, NG tubes can be removed several times a day, making the use of x-rays to verify every tube placement concerning for increased radiation exposure.

About the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

The University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing is one of the world's leading schools of nursing. For the second year in a row, it is ranked the #1 nursing school in the world by QS University, and has four graduate programs ranked number one by U.S. News & World Report, the most of any school in the United States. Penn Nursing is currently ranked # 1 in funding from the National Institutes of Health, among other schools of nursing. Penn Nursing prepares nurse scientists and nurse leaders to meet the health needs of a global society through research, education, and practice. Follow Penn Nursing on: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram & YouTube.

About Children's Hospital of Philadelphia: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia was founded in 1855 as the nation's first pediatric hospital. Through its long-standing commitment to providing exceptional patient care, training new generations of pediatric healthcare professionals, and pioneering major research initiatives, Children's Hospital has fostered many discoveries that have benefited children worldwide. Its pediatric research program is among the largest in the country. In addition, its unique family-centered care and public service programs have brought the 546-bed hospital recognition as a leading advocate for children and adolescents. For more information, visit http://www.chop.edu

University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing

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