Nav: Home

New study finds nanoparticles show promise in therapy for triple-negative breast cancer

October 01, 2018

WASHINGTON (Oct. 1, 2018) -- Approximately 10-20 percent of diagnosed breast cancers are found to be triple-negative, meaning the breast cancer cells test negative for estrogen and progesterone receptors as well as HER2 receptors, genes that can play a role in the development of breast cancer. Triple-negative breast cancer can be more aggressive and difficult to treat as the cancer cells do not respond to hormonal therapies or therapies that target HER2 receptors.

A new study from the George Washington University (GW) Cancer Center found that nanoparticle-encapsulated doxorubicin is promising in the treatment of triple-negative breast cancer. Doxorubicin is a well-known anthracycline drug class used primarily in combination chemotherapy.

The majority of patients with triple-negative breast cancer receive doses of doxorubicin along with taxane and cyclophosphamide as preoperative chemotherapy. About 25-45 percent of those patients respond to this medication and have excellent long-term prognosis.

"Nanomedicine is a very exciting avenue in modern drug development," said Adam Friedman, MD, director of the Supportive Oncodermatology Clinic at GW Cancer Center, professor of dermatology at the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences, and senior author of the study. "Nanotechnology offers many benefits, including the ability to purposefully customize your drug or diagnostic at the atomic scale, enhancing its ability to interact with its biological target and improve outcomes and potentially safety."

In order to determine the most effective delivery of doxorubicin when encapsulated in a nanoparticle platform, Friedman and his collaborators at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, synthesized several formulations of doxorubicin containing nanoparticles to identify nanoparticle characteristics which best impact biologic activity against several resistant cancer cell lines.

With the nanoparticle, the team manipulated the size and timed release of the medication and found that increased cell kill in triple-negative breast cancer cells was associated with the smallest size of nanoparticles and the slowest release of doxorubicin.

"This study provides clues for new potential strategies utilizing and manipulating nanotechnology to overcome cancer cell drug resistance," said Friedman. "We have our work cut out for us, but this study shows that we are moving in the right direction."
-end-
The study, titled "Nanoparticle-Encapsulated Doxorubicin Demonstrates Superior Tumor Cell Kill in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Subtypes Intrinsically Resistant to Doxorubicin" is published in Precision Nanomedicine, a scientist-owned, not-for-profit, fully open access journal that promotes all practical, rational, and progressive aspects of nanomedicine. It is supported by the European Foundation for Nanomedicine and by the International Society for Nanomedicine.

To read the full study, visit https://precisionnanomedicine.com/article/22.

Media: To interview Dr. Friedman, please contact Ashley Rizzardo at amrizz713@gwu.edu or 202-994-8679.

About the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences Founded in 1824, the GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS) was the first medical school in the nation's capital and is the 11th oldest in the country. Working together in our nation's capital, with integrity and resolve, the GW SMHS is committed to improving the health and well-being of our local, national, and global communities. smhs.gwu.edu

George Washington University

Related Breast Cancer Articles:

Does MRI plus mammography improve detection of new breast cancer after breast conservation therapy?
A new article published by JAMA Oncology compares outcomes for combined mammography and MRI or ultrasonography screenings for new breast cancers in women who have previously undergone breast conservation surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer initially diagnosed at 50 or younger.
Blood test offers improved breast cancer detection tool to reduce use of breast biopsy
A Clinical Breast Cancer study demonstrates Videssa Breast can inform better next steps after abnormal mammogram results and potentially reduce biopsies up to 67 percent.
Surgery to remove unaffected breast in early breast cancer increases
The proportion of women in the United States undergoing surgery for early-stage breast cancer who have preventive mastectomy to remove the unaffected breast increased significantly in recent years, particularly among younger women, and varied substantially across states.
Breast cancer patients with dense breast tissue more likely to develop contralateral disease
Breast cancer patients with dense breast tissue have almost a two-fold increased risk of developing disease in the contralateral breast, according to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer.
Some early breast cancer patients benefit more from breast conservation than from mastectomy
Breast conserving therapy (BCT) is better than mastectomy for patients with some types of early breast cancer, according to results from the largest study to date, presented at ECC2017.
More Breast Cancer News and Breast Cancer Current Events

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans
More than test scores or good grades — what do kids need to prepare them for the future? This hour, guest host Manoush Zomorodi and TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, in and out of the classroom. Guests include educators Olympia Della Flora and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#535 Superior
Apologies for the delay getting this week's episode out! A technical glitch slowed us down, but all is once again well. This week, we look at the often troubling intertwining of science and race: its long history, its ability to persist even during periods of disrepute, and the current forms it takes as it resurfaces, leveraging the internet and nationalism to buoy itself. We speak with Angela Saini, independent journalist and author of the new book "Superior: The Return of Race Science", about where race science went and how it's coming back.