Special issue of Health Physics highlights women in radiation protection

October 01, 2018

October 1, 2018 -A special November issue of Health Physics journal presents 13 original research papers, reviews, and commentaries related to women's contributions to and experiences in radiation protection and safety.Health Physics, the official journal of the Health Physics Society (HPS) is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

All of the included studies and other articles were led by women, according to an introduction by Guest Editor Nicole E. Martinez, PhD, of Clemson University. She writes, "I see this special issue as providing an in-hand example of the commitment within the society to fostering an inclusive, well-rounded environment."

Women's Contributions to Radiation Safety and Protection - Past, Present and Future

Health physicists are scientists specializing in radiation protection. They work in a wide range of fields, including hospitals, industry, nuclear power plants - anywhere radiation or radioactive material is used or found. Highlighting the historic roles of several women pioneers in the radiation sciences, Dr. Martinez emphasizes the importance of "building community" in meeting critical goals for radiation protection.

Highlights of the special issue include:

Other topics include new research on approaches in monitoring radiation exposure, the challenges of measuring the health impact of low doses of radiation, the changing role of the medical center radiation safety officer, and organizational issues in ensuring effective radiation safety practices. Noting that over half of the articles are student papers, Dr. Martinez voices how encouraging it is to see so many active and talented young scientists in the field.

Dr. Martinez also emphasizes that supporting women (and other under-represented minorities) doesn't mean not supporting men (or the well-represented majority). "It means making a conscious effort to hear and include perspectives that might not be the norm," she writes. "Neglecting to consider the whole of the membership can lead to loss of talent, less discovery, and hindrance of the advancement of the field."
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Click here to read the November issue of Health Physics.

About Health Physics

Health Physics, first published in 1958, provides the latest research to a wide variety of radiation safety professionals including health physicists, nuclear chemists, medical physicists, and radiation safety officers with interests in nuclear and radiation science. The Journal allows professionals in these and other disciplines in science and engineering to stay on the cutting edge of scientific and technological advances in the field of radiation safety. The Journal publishes original papers, technical notes, articles on advances in practical applications, editorials, and correspondence. Journal articles report on the latest findings in theoretical, practical, and applied disciplines of epidemiology and radiation effects, radiation biology and radiation science, and radiation ecology, to name just a few.

About the Health Physics Society

The Health Physics Society (HPS), formed in 1956, is a scientific organization of professionals who specialize in radiation safety. Its mission is to support its members in the practice of their profession and to promote excellence in the science and practice of radiation safety. Today its members represent all scientific and technical areas related to radiation safety, including academia, government, medicine, research and development, analytical services, consulting, and industry in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The Society is chartered in the United States as an independent nonprofit scientific organization and, as such, is not affiliated with any government or industrial organization or private entity.

About Wolters Kluwer

Wolters Kluwer is a global leader in professional information, software solutions, and services for the health, tax & accounting, finance, risk & compliance, and legal sectors. We help our customers make critical decisions every day by providing expert solutions that combine deep domain knowledge with specialized technology and services.

Wolters Kluwer, headquartered in the Netherlands, reported 2017 annual revenues of €4.4 billion. The company serves customers in over 180 countries, maintains operations in over 40 countries, and employs approximately 19,000 people worldwide.

Wolters Kluwer Health is a leading global provider of trusted clinical technology and evidence-based solutions that engage clinicians, patients, researchers and students with advanced clinical decision support, learning and research and clinical intelligence. For more information about our solutions, visit http://healthclarity.wolterskluwer.com and follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter @WKHealth.

Wolters Kluwer Health

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