Nav: Home

Blue light special: FSU researcher finds new chemical clusters emit highly efficient light

October 01, 2018

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. -- A Florida State University research team has discovered that a unique organic-inorganic compound containing zero-dimensional molecular clusters emits a highly efficient blue light.

The new discovery is reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

Associate Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Biwu Ma has been working with an emerging class of functional materials that are organic-inorganic metal halide hybrids. A typical metal halide hybrid contains metal and halogen, and another component that can be either organic or inorganic.

Ma describes these metal halide hybrids as materials built from Lego-like pieces because they can be assembled by using the same chemical building blocks -- metal halide octahedrons.

"Basically, all these materials have the same building blocks." Ma said. "What we have been working on is to find the chemistry to put these Lego pieces together to form different configurations and then explore their distinct properties -- such as luminescence -- that accompany these configurations."

Previously, Ma's group has reported metal halide layers, wires and tubes using these building blocks.

The newly developed single crystalline assembly of metal halide clusters has a highly efficient blue emission -- the essential color for solid state lighting and full color display applications.

It has more than 80 percent efficiency, meaning it could potentially be developed for use in photon-related technologies like lasers or light-emitting diodes. "It has fantastic photophysical properties," Ma said. "This quantum efficiency is actually among the highest values reported to date for single crystalline blue light emitters."
-end-
Ma's co-authors on the paper are graduate students Chenkun Zhou, Michael Worku, Jennifer Neu, Yan Zhou, Yu Tian and Sujin Lee, postdoctoral researcher Haoran Lin; Professor Theo Siegrist; and Peter Djurovich, a research professor from University of Southern California. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

Florida State University

Related Chemistry Articles:

Coordination chemistry and Alzheimer's disease
It has become evident recently that the interactions between copper and amyloid-β neurotoxically impact the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease.
Can ionic liquids transform chemistry?
Table salt is a commonplace ingredient in the kitchen, but a different kind of salt is at the forefront of chemistry innovation.
Principles for a green chemistry future
A team led by researchers from the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies recently authored a paper featured in Science that outlines how green chemistry is essential for a sustainable future.
Sugar changes the chemistry of your brain
The idea of food addiction is a very controversial topic among scientists.
Reflecting on the year in chemistry
A lot can happen in a year, especially when it comes to science.
Better chemistry through tiny antennae
A research team at The University of Tokyo has developed a new method for actively controlling the breaking of chemical bonds by shining infrared lasers on tiny antennae.
Chemistry in motion
For the first time, researchers have managed to view previously inaccessible details of certain chemical processes.
Researchers enrich silver chemistry
Researchers from Russia and Saudi Arabia have proposed an efficient method for obtaining fundamental data necessary for understanding chemical and physical processes involving substances in the gaseous state.
The chemistry behind kibble (video)
Have you ever thought about how strange it is that dogs eat these dry, weird-smelling bits of food for their entire lives and never get sick of them?
Top 10 chemistry start-ups
Starting a new chemistry-based company is one part discovery, one part risk.
More Chemistry News and Chemistry Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Listen Again: Reinvention
Change is hard, but it's also an opportunity to discover and reimagine what you thought you knew. From our economy, to music, to even ourselves–this hour TED speakers explore the power of reinvention. Guests include OK Go lead singer Damian Kulash Jr., former college gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field, Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs, and entrepreneur Nick Hanauer.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#562 Superbug to Bedside
By now we're all good and scared about antibiotic resistance, one of the many things coming to get us all. But there's good news, sort of. News antibiotics are coming out! How do they get tested? What does that kind of a trial look like and how does it happen? Host Bethany Brookeshire talks with Matt McCarthy, author of "Superbugs: The Race to Stop an Epidemic", about the ins and outs of testing a new antibiotic in the hospital.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 6: Strange Times
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It's a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.