Every day spent in the hospital, readmission likelihood increases by 2.9 percent in rural cities

October 01, 2018

SAN ANTONIO, TX (October 1, 2018)­­-Hospital readmissions, cost hospitals about $26 billion annually. Systems like the Hospital Readmission Reduction Program (HRRP) within the Affordable Care Act penalize hospitals with higher readmission rates for targeted diagnoses. Healthcare data reveals that healthcare facilities located in rural Southern Appalachia show readmission rates that are above the national average, which results in penalties to hospitals within this region. In order to assess and prevent the causes of these frequent hospital readmission, researchers performed a retrospective review of rural Southern Appalachia.

Researchers reviewed 15,500 patients admitted to rural Southern Appalachia hospitals from January 1, 2014 to October 31, 2017. In order to determine associations with readmission, univariate analyses and regression modeling were conducted on potential associated variables such as length of stay, age, gender, healthcare payor, discharge month/day/time, tobacco use, smoking cessation education, medication reconciliation upon discharge, and presence of comorbid diagnoses like diabetes mellitus, hypertension chronic renal failure, and psychiatric disorders.

The authors found that every day spent in the hospital, readmission likelihood increases by 2.9%. Individuals discharged between 0100 - 1300 were less likely to be readmitted compared to those discharged between 1300 - 0100 (p<0.0001). Former smokers were more likely than never smokers to be readmitted and if patients were provided with smoking cessation education at discharge decreased the likelihood of readmission. The discharge month analysis indicated a significant effect only for those discharged in March and August compared to January. Research also revealed that patients with a diagnosis of COPD, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, psychiatric disorders and chronic renal failure had an increased likelihood of readmission as well.

"Primary causes of hospital readmissions in rural Southern Appalachia are increased length of stay, discharges after 1300, history of smoking, and presence of comorbid COPD, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic renal failure, and psychiatric disorders," says Dr. Michael Zhang, researcher. "Some methods to prevent readmissions are decreasing length of stay, discharging patients before 1300, providing smoking cessation education, and controlling comorbid diagnoses."

Further results from these two studies will be shared at CHEST Annual Meeting 2018 in San Antonio on Monday, October 8, 5:00 PM to 5:15 PM at the Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Room 206B. The study abstracts can be viewed on the journal CHEST® website.
-end-
ABOUT CHEST 2018

CHEST 2018 is the 84th annual meeting for the American College of Chest Physicians, held October 6-October 10, 2018, in San Antonio, Texas. The American College of Chest Physicians, publisher of the journal CHEST®, is the global leader in advancing best patient outcomes through innovative chest medicine education, clinical research and team-based care. Its mission is to champion the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of chest diseases through education, communication and research. It serves as an essential connection to clinical knowledge and resources for its 19,000 members from around the world who provide patient care in pulmonary, critical care and sleep medicine For more information about CHEST 2018, visit chestmeeting.chestnet.org, or follow CHEST meeting hashtag, #CHEST2018, on social media.

American College of Chest Physicians

Related Hospitals Articles from Brightsurf:

'Best' hospitals should be required to deliver tobacco treatment
A UCLA-led report published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine exposes what the authors call a weakness in the high-profile 'Best Hospitals Honor Roll' published annually by US News and World Report.

Veterans undergoing elective PCI at community hospitals may have increased chance of death compared to those treated at VA hospitals
Veterans who underwent elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for stable angina at a community facility were at a 33% increased hazard, or chance, of death compared to patients treated within the Veterans Affairs (VA) Healthcare System, according to an analysis of nearly 9,000 veterans published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

How should hospitals ask patients for donations?
A new study looks for the first time at patients' views of hospital fundraising, including legally allowable practices that encourage physicians to work with their hospital's fundraising professionals.

Proximity of hospitals to mass shootings in US
Nontrauma center hospitals were the nearest hospitals to most of the mass shootings (five or more people injured or killed by a gun) that happened in the US in 2019.

'Five star' hospitals often provide fewer services than other hospitals, new data suggests
If you're looking for a top-notch hospital with a wide range of services, narrowing your list to hospitals with a five-star patient experience rating might lead you astray.

Costs of care similar or lower at teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals
Total costs of care are similar or somewhat lower among teaching hospitals compared to non-teaching hospitals among Medicare beneficiaries treated for common medical and surgical conditions, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H.

How common, preventable are sepsis-associated deaths in hospitals?
This study estimates how common sepsis-related deaths are in hospitals and how preventable those deaths might be.

Veterans health administration hospitals outperform non-VHA hospitals in most markets
In a new study, researchers from The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice and the White River Junction VA Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont, used the most current publicly available data to compare health outcomes for VA and non-VA hospitals within 121 local healthcare markets that included both a VA medical center and a non-VA hospital.

Tele-ERs can help strengthen rural hospitals
A new study from the University of Iowa finds rural hospitals that use tele-medicine to back up their emergency room health care providers save money and find it easier to recruit new physicians.

Hospitals may take too much of the blame for unplanned readmissions
A new study out of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center reveals that the preventability of readmissions changes over time: readmissions within the first week after discharge are often preventable by the hospital, whereas readmissions later are often related to patients' difficultly accessing outpatient clinics.

Read More: Hospitals News and Hospitals Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.