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Plastic surgery reflects on its past; Highlights innovations for the future of the specialty

October 02, 2006

WHO: More than 6,000 plastic surgeons and others involved in the specialty from around the world.

WHAT: Plastic Surgery 2006, the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) annual scientific meeting, will include presentations by experts discussing cutting-edge techniques and developments and the latest issues affecting plastic surgery. Studies to be presented include lip augmentation/rejuvenation restoring loss of fat due to age, breast asymmetry surgery improving quality of life and self-esteem and unproven criteria for denial of medically necessary breast reduction surgery by insurance companies.

WHY: The roots of plastic surgery began with the drive to repair brutal injuries in World War I and today this medical specialty remains at the forefront of innovation. In fact, it was a plastic surgeon who performed the first organ transplant--a kidney. Honoring the past while creating the future, ASPS celebrates its 75th anniversary with an everlasting focus on emerging trends.

WHEN: Oct. 6-11, 2006

WHERE: Moscone Convention Center 747 Howard Street, San Francisco, Calif. 94103 Press Room: #111

SPECIAL EVENTS: Oct. 5, 10 a.m., Pre-Annual Meeting Event, "Helmets 4 Safety": ASPS donates 2,000 multi-sport helmets to San Francisco children at Francisco Middle School (2190 Powell Street) to promote safety and the prevention of facial injuries and fractures.

Oct. 7, 4:30 p.m., Opening Ceremonies: Hear the inspirational stories of four reconstructive plastic surgery heroes during the Patients of Courage: Triumph Over Adversity awards honoring patients who have overcome devastating illness or injury and contributed to their community. (Patients are available for interviews.) Keynote speaker J. Ian Morrison, PhD, internationally known author, consultant and futurist specializing in long-term forecasting on health care, will present "Looking at the Future of Plastic Surgery."

Oct. 9, 9:30 a.m., Press Briefing: Plastic Surgeons Repairing Battle Wounds: Meet U.S. troops injured in Iraq and military plastic surgeons who saved their lives and limbs.

Oct. 9, noon, Industry Forum: This first-ever event for ASPS will feature financial analysts, industry CEOs and plastic surgeons discussing the latest data regarding trends, innovations and forecasts for the high-profile cosmetic plastic surgery market.
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CONTACT: ASPS Media Relations Before Oct. 7: 847-228-9900 - Pam Anton, ext. 349 or Brian Hugins, ext. 416 Oct. 7-11: 415-905-1730

American Society of Plastic Surgeons

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