Should schoolgirls be vaccinated against cancer virus?

October 02, 2007

The routine vaccination of children against Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) - the first adolescent vaccine against a sexually transmitted infection - will be discussed at the National Cancer Research Institute conference in Birmingham today (1515hrs, Tuesday 2 October).

Professor Henry Kitchener, of The University of Manchester, will chair the session and discuss the role of preventative HPV vaccines.

His colleague Dr Loretta Brabin, who is leading a pilot study into the acceptability and feasibility of the three-dose vaccine Cervarix, will also contribute. The study Department of Health is aware of the study, which will help inform the national vaccine programme.

The other speakers include Professor Richard Roden, of the John Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, US, who will discuss second generation preventative HPV vaccines which would potentially protect against a broader range of high risk HPV types.

Professor Cornelius Melief, of Leiden University Medical Centre, in The Netherlands, will present data on the use of a therapeutic HPV vaccine which is designed to treat established HPV-associated precancerous lesions.
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For more information or to arrange an interview with Professor Henry Kitchener or Dr Loretta Brabin, please contact NCRI press office on 07050 264 059 or University of Manchester Media Relations Officer Mikaela Sitford on 07768 980942.

Editor's note:

The University of Manchester Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences:
http://www.manchester.ac.uk/

The John Hopkins School of Medicine:
http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/index.html

Leiden University Medical Centre:
http://www.leidenuniv.nl/

The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference is the UK's premier forum for disseminating advances across all aspects of cancer research. AstraZeneca is the gold sponsor for the NCRI Cancer Conference 2007.

The National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) was established in April 2001. It is a partnership between government, the voluntary sector and the private sector, with the primary mission of maximising patient benefit that accrues from cancer research in the UK through coordination of effort and joint planning towards an integrated national strategy for cancer research. See www.ncri.org.uk.

The NCRI consists of: The Association of British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI); The Association for International Cancer Research; The Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council; Breakthrough Breast Cancer; Breast Cancer Campaign; Cancer Research UK; Department of Health; Economic and Social Research Council; Leukaemia Research Fund; Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research; Macmillan Cancer Support; Marie Curie Cancer Care; The Medical Research Council; Northern Ireland Health and Personal Social Services Research & Development Office; Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation; Scottish Executive Health Department; Tenovus; Wales Office of Research and Development for Health & Social Care; Wellcome Trust; and Yorkshire Cancer Research.

University of Manchester

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