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World leaders in infectious diseases convene to discuss emerging global viruses

October 02, 2008

WHO: The American Society Of Tropical Medicine And Hygiene (ASTMH)

WHAT: The Latest Findings Regarding the Prevention, Treatment and Containment of Emerging and Global Infectious Diseases

WHEN: December 7 - 11, 2008

WHERE: ASTMH's 57th Annual Meeting at the Sheraton New Orleans, New Orleans, LA

Nearly 2,700 leading researchers and scientists in the area of infectious and emerging disease are expected to attend the 57th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene to discuss the prevention and treatment of global health threats. Topics and speakers scheduled for the New Orleans meeting include:

Meeting Topics:
  • The financial burden of global world health - can prevention and early treatment of disease in other countries ultimately save the U.S. money?
  • Advances in creating new repellents for mosquito-transmitted diseases, such as West Nile and Dengue Fever
  • Progress made in the pursuit to eradicate malaria
  • Updates on infectious disease vaccine developments
  • Immigrant and refugee health, including immunizations and women's health issues
  • What to know about infectious diseases when traveling outside the U.S.
This year's meeting will include speakers from around the world with organizations at the forefront of infectious disease health and prevention including PATH, The Carter Foundation, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, WHO, NIH and CDC.

Two key lectures to be delivered during the opening days of the meeting include:
  • December 7th: "The Genius of Boldness: Thinking Big in Global Health" presented by Sir Richard Feachem, former executive director for the United Nations Global Fund.
  • December 8th: "The Hunt for the Reservoir Hosts of Marburg and Ebola Viruses" presented by Robert Swanepoel, National Institute for Communicable Diseases.
-end-


American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

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