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Fourth Annual IDWeek brings together internationally-recognized infectious disease experts

October 02, 2015

WHAT: Infectious disease experts nationwide will gather in San Diego for the 4th annual IDWeek Oct. 7-11. A combined meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA), the HIV Medicine Association (HIVMA) and the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society (PIDS), IDWeek features the latest in prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and epidemiology of infectious diseases, including HIV. Reporters who attend the meeting will have unparalleled access to the latest scientific advances in the field of infectious diseases - and the internationally recognized experts who will be presenting them.

This year's press conference schedule includes:

Wednesday, October 7

Noon PT Overview

Thursday, October 8

8 a.m. PT HIV and the Affordable Care Act
9 a.m. PT Measles vaccination in the U.S.

Friday, October 9

8 a.m. PT Infection and falling
9 a.m. PT Antibiotic stewardship and C. diff
10 a.m. PT Vaccines and traveling

Press conferences will be available via telephone for reporters who cannot attend in person. Email ezaideman@pcipr.com for details about the press conferences and receive the dial-in numbers.

For more information, visit http://www.idweek.org or follow us on twitter or Facebook.

WHEN: October 7-11, 2015

WHERE: San Diego Convention Center 111 W Harbor Dr, San Diego, CA 92101

@IDWeek2015
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Infectious Diseases Society of America

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