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New study from Harvard examines gender differences in obtaining first NIH research award

October 02, 2017

New Rochelle, NY, Oct.2, 2017 -- A study of more than 5,400 instructors and assistant professors at Harvard Medical School compared differences between males and females for receipt of their first National Institutes of Health research award. The study, which also examined gender differences in numbers of publications, h-index, size of coauthor networks, and becoming an assistant professor, is published in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Women's Health website until November 2, 2017.

Erica Warner, ScD, MPH and coauthors from Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA reported that only 7.6% (413/5,445) of young researchers at Harvard Medical School received their first NIH R01 award during the study period of 2008-2015. They found no significant gender difference in the likelihood of receiving an award, as detailed in the article entitled "Gender Differences in Receipt of National Institutes of Health R01 Grants Among Junior Faculty at an Academic Medical Center: The Role of Connectivity, Rank, and Research Productivity", The study design did not allow them to distinguish between faculty that did not apply for a grant award and those who applied but were not successful.

"This study examined the outcome of the complex process involved in applying for and obtaining a research award from the NIH. The authors observed no significant sex disparity in receipt of a R01 grant, but they did find that females overall had fewer publications, a lower h-index, smaller coauthor networks, and were less likely to be assistant professors," says Susan G. Kornstein, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Women's Health, Executive Director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Institute for Women's Health, Richmond, VA, and President of the Academy of Women's Health.
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Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institutes of Health under Award Numbers 1DP4GM096852, 1K01CA188075-01, 5U01GM112623-02. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

About the Journal

Journal of Women's Health, published monthly, is a core multidisciplinary journal dedicated to the diseases and conditions that hold greater risk for or are more prevalent among women, as well as diseases that present differently in women. Led by Editor-in-Chief Susan G. Kornstein, MD, Executive Director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Institute for Women's Health, Richmond, VA, and President of the Academy of Women's Health, the Journal covers the latest advances and clinical applications of new diagnostic procedures and therapeutic protocols for the prevention and management of women's healthcare issues. Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed on the Journal of Women's Health website. Journal of Women's Health is the official journal of the Academy of Women's Health and the Society for Women's Health Research.

About the Academy

Academy of Women's Health is an interdisciplinary, international association of physicians, nurses, and other health professionals who work across the broad field of women's health, providing its members with up-to-date advances and options in clinical care that will enable the best outcomes for their women patients. The Academy's focus includes the dissemination of translational research and evidence-based practices for disease prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of women across the lifespan.

About the Publisher

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including LGBT Health, Transgender Health, Population Health Management, and Breastfeeding Medicine. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 140 Huguenot Street, New Rochelle, NY 10801 http://www.liebertpub.com Phone: 914-740-2100 800 M-LIEBERT Fax 914-740-2101

Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News

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New study from Harvard examines gender differences in obtaining first NIH research award
A study of more than 5,400 instructors and assistant professors at Harvard Medical School compared differences between males and females for receipt of their first National Institutes of Health research award.
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