Man develops severe liver damage after taking epsom salts

October 02, 2017

A 38-year-old man developed serious liver damage after taking epsom salts to treat gallstones, reveal doctors in the journal BMJ Case Reports.

The man had lost his appetite and was jaundiced. He was tested for a range of common liver diseases, all of which were negative. But a biopsy specimen showed that he had signs of liver damage.

It emerged that he had been taking three tablespoons of Epsom salts in lukewarm water for 15 days. He had been advised by a naturopath that this would dissolve his gallstones.

Taking too much Epsom salts can cause diarrhoea, abnormal heart rhythm, and kidney damage.

In this case, the man took a large quantity of salts over two weeks, which prompted rapid worsening of fibrosis (tissue scarring).

And the doctors caution that certain conditions might heighten the risk of liver damage when combined with Epsom salts.

The man was advised to stop taking the salts, to drink plenty of fluids, and was given medication to prevent further liver damage. And after around six weeks, his liver function had returned to normal.
-end-


BMJ

Related Fibrosis Articles from Brightsurf:

One step for fibrosis, one giant leap for scleroderma
At the Medical University of South Carolina, a team of researchers has demonstrated a ''moonlighting'' role for lysyl oxidase (LOX) in scleroderma.

Cystic fibrosis: why so many respiratory complications?
Cystic fibrosis, one of the most common genetic diseases in Switzerland, causes severe respiratory and digestive disorders.

Closing in on liver fibrosis: Detailing the fibrosis process at unprecedented resolution
Today, there is no effective way to treat liver fibrosis.

Liver fibrosis 'off switch' discovered in mice
UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers identified several genetic switches, or transcription factors, that determine whether or not liver cells produce collagen -- providing a new therapeutic target for liver fibrosis.

Magnetic nanomaterials become an effective treatment against liver fibrosis
Fibrosis may affect different body organs. It develops as a reaction to long-time inflammation and is supposed to isolate the inflammation site from surrounding tissues.

Cystic fibrosis carriers are at increased risk for cystic fibrosis-related conditions
A University of Iowa study challenges the conventional wisdom that having just one mutated copy of the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene has no effects on a person's health.

Short or long sleep associated with Pulmonary Fibrosis
Scientists have discovered that people who regularly sleep for more than 11 hours or less than 4 hours are 2-3 times more likely to have the incurable disease, pulmonary fibrosis, compared to those that sleep for 7 hours in a day.

Promising steps towards a treatment for pulmonary fibrosis
Research published in the journal Science Translational Medicine on 25 September by members of the Cardiovascular Disease Mechanisms group at the MRC LMS in collaboration with Duke-NUS Medical School, National Heart Centre Singapore & National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, showed that blocking a protein called interleukin-11 (IL-11) using therapeutic antibodies can reverse the fibrosis in the lung.

Cibio knocks out cystic fibrosis
The fight against cystic fibrosis continues, targeting in particular some of the mutations that cause it.

How fibrosis develops in butterfly syndrome patients
Researchers have pinpointed how fibrosis develops in butterfly syndrome patients.

Read More: Fibrosis News and Fibrosis Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.