Is thyroid hormone therapy for early underactive thyroid associated with better quality of life?

October 02, 2018

Bottom Line: An early form of underactive thyroid (when the body doesn't produce enough thyroid hormones) called subclinical hypothyroidism is a common condition but the benefit of thyroid hormone therapy on quality of life and symptoms is uncertain. This study, which analyzed the combined results of 21 randomized clinical trials with 2,200 participants with subclinical hypothyroidism, reports that thyroid hormone therapy wasn't associated with improved quality of life or thyroid-related symptoms. The authors suggest the results don't support routine use of thyroid hormone therapy in adults with subclinical hypothyroidism.

Authors: Martin Feller, M.D., M.Sc., University of Bern, Switzerland, and coauthors

To Learn More: The full study is available on the For The Media website.

(doi:10.1001/jama.2018.13770)

Editor's Note: The article includes conflict of interest and funding/support disclosures. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

Related Material

Previously published by JAMA:

Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone in the Evaluation of Subclinical Hypothyroidism

Subclinical Thyroid Dysfunction and Fracture Risk
-end-
Want to embed a link to this study in your story? Link will be live at the embargo time: http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/10.1001/jama.2018.13770

JAMA

Related Thyroid Articles from Brightsurf:

Thyroid inflammation linked to anxiety disorders
Patients with autoimmune inflammation of their thyroid may be at greater risk of developing anxiety, according to a study being presented at e-ECE 2020.

Some physicians are ordering thyroid tests for unsupported reasons
Up to one-third of physicians reported sending patients for a thyroid ultrasound for reasons not supported by clinical care guidelines, a new study led by University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center researchers finds.

Trends in the global burden of thyroid cancer
This study examined the worldwide trends of thyroid cancer from 1990 to 2017 according to geographic location, sex, age and socioeconomic factors.

Thyroid dysfunction in pregnancy being overdiagnosed, overtreated
The current practice of testing most pregnant women for thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) may be leading to overdiagnosis and overtreatment, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.191664

Patients with COVID-19 may develop thyroid infection
COVID-19 infection may cause subacute thyroiditis, according to a new case study published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Thyroid cancer rates in US
An analysis suggests rates of thyroid cancer in the US appear to have plateaued in recent years after decades on the rise.

New test for thyroid cancer could prevent unnecessary surgery
Each year, thanks to inconclusive tests for thyroid cancer, thousands of people undergo unnecessary surgeries to remove part or all of their thyroids.

New radiomics model uses immunohistochemistry to predict thyroid nodules
American Journal of Roentgenology researchers have validated a first-of-its-kind machine learning-based model to evaluate immunohistochemical characteristics in patients with suspected thyroid nodules, achieving 'excellent performance' for individualized noninvasive prediction of the presence of cytokeratin 19, galectin 3, and thyroperoxidase based upon CT images.

Thyroid screening may not be needed in all youth with psychiatric disorders
A new study from researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) and Cincinnati Children's looks at the prevalence of abnormal thyroid function in youth with severe mood and anxiety disorder.

Are doctors treating more thyroid cancer patients than necessary?
New research may help change treatment practices for patients diagnosed with low risk thyroid cancer.

Read More: Thyroid News and Thyroid Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.