Temple Lung Center director reports ongoing positive results for emphysema treatment study

October 02, 2018

(Philadelphia, PA) - Dr. Gerard Criner, MD, FACP, FACCP, Chair and Professor of Thoracic Medicine and Surgery at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, announced the 12-month results of the EMPROVE multicenter, randomized and controlled study for the Spiration® Valve System (SVS), a minimally invasive treatment for severe emphysema, at the European Respiratory Society International Congress (ERS) in Paris, France, on Sept. 18.

The EMPROVE trial enrolled 172 patients across 31 centers in the U.S. and Canada and evaluated the safety and effectiveness of the Spiration® Valve System compared to optimal medical care in patients with severe emphysema in a 2-to-1 randomization. Patients eligible for the EMPROVE trial were those with severe airflow obstruction, dyspnea (shortness of breath) and hyperinflation, which occurs when air becomes trapped in the lungs and makes breathing difficult.

Dr. Criner, the EMPROVE study's lead enroller, presented initial positive results based on a six-month primary endpoint earlier in the year at the American Thoracic Society Annual Conference in San Diego. The subsequent presentation at ERS, one of the largest respiratory meetings of the year, reported on the longer-term 12-month results of the study.

"The EMPROVE study shows that treatment of severe emphysema with the Spiration® Valve System resulted in statistical and clinically meaningful improvements in FEV1, target lobe volume reduction, dyspnea and quality-of-life parameters, with a good safety profile. Most importantly, the results presented at ERS show the benefits of valve treatment continue to be durable through 12 months," Dr. Criner said.

Spiration® Valve System treatment, designed to isolate and reduce volume in the targeted emphysematous lobe, resulted in a mean reduction of 974 milliliters (52.8 percent reduction). As a result of the targeted lobe volume reduction, 37.2 percent of the SVS-treated group had a greater than 15 percent improvement in FEV1 at one year compared to 5.1 percent in the control group, a statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvement in lung function.

Additionally, patients treated with the Spiration® Valve showed a statistically significant 33 percent relative improvement in shortness of breath (measured by the mMRC score) in the SVS-treated group compared to the control group.

"The reduction of dyspnea reflected by the reduction in the mMRC score is a clinical improvement of the highest priority in patients with emphysema and severe hyperinflation," Dr. Criner said.

The Spiration® Valve is an umbrella-shaped, one-way valve that is placed in the lungs through a flexible bronchoscope that provides surgeons and pulmonologists with a novel method for limiting distal airflow to the damaged or diseased lung. The system is CE Mark-approved in Europe for the treatment of air leaks and severe, heterogeneous emphysema with evidence of low collateral ventilation such as complete fissures. It is not approved for use in emphysema patients in the U.S. but is subject to ongoing clinical investigation in which approval for use in emphysema will be sought.

The most common procedure-related serious adverse event was pneumothorax (lasting more than seven days) in 12.4 percent of the SVS-treated patients, a complication that is a consequence of effective bronchoscopic lung volume reduction that has previously been demonstrated in patients undergoing endobronchial valve insertion for severe emphysema.

"The EMPROVE study demonstrates that HRCT assessment alone is an effective method for appropriate patient and the target lobe selection, resulting in a favorable risk-benefit profile with the Spiration® Valve System. Data from randomized controlled trials such as the EMPROVE study help further physician understanding of new treatment options for this underserved emphysema population," Dr. Criner said.
-end-
The EMPROVE study was sponsored by Olympus Respiratory America, a part of Olympus Corporation and the developer of the Spiration® Valve System.

Editor's Note: Neither Dr. Criner nor any member of his immediate family has financial interest in Olympus Respiratory America or Olympus Corporation.

About Temple Health

Temple University Health System (TUHS) is a $2.1 billion academic health system dedicated to providing access to quality patient care and supporting excellence in medical education and research. The Health System consists of Temple University Hospital (TUH), ranked among the "Best Hospitals" in the region by U.S. News & World Report; TUH-Episcopal Campus; TUH-Northeastern Campus; Fox Chase Cancer Center, an NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center; Jeanes Hospital, a community-based hospital offering medical, surgical and emergency services; Temple Transport Team, a ground and air-ambulance company; and Temple Physicians, Inc., a network of community-based specialty and primary-care physician practices. TUHS is affiliated with the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, and Temple University Physicians, which is Temple Health's physician practice plan comprised of more than 500 full-time and part-time academic physicians in 20 clinical departments.

The Lewis Katz School of Medicine (LKSOM), established in 1901, is one of the nation's leading medical schools. Each year, the School of Medicine educates more than 800 medical students and 140 graduate students. Based on its level of funding from the National Institutes of Health, the Katz School of Medicine is the second-highest ranked medical school in Philadelphia and the third-highest in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. According to U.S. News & World Report, LKSOM is among the top 10 most applied-to medical schools in the nation.

Temple Health refers to the health, education and research activities carried out by the affiliates of Temple University Health System (TUHS) and by the Katz School of Medicine. TUHS neither provides nor controls the provision of health care. All health care is provided by its member organizations or independent health care providers affiliated with TUHS member organizations. Each TUHS member organization is owned and operated pursuant to its governing documents.

Temple University Health System

Related Emphysema Articles from Brightsurf:

Lung-specific risk factors may increase hip fracture risk in individuals who smoke
Smoking has been linked to a higher risk of bone fractures.

A targeted treatment for emphysema?
Emphysema is a progressive, debilitating lung disease in which the lung's breathing sacs, or alveoli, enlarge, get thinner, and eventually are destroyed as the cells die off.

E-cigs can trigger same lung changes seen in smokers, emphysema
In a study published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, the UNC scientists found that the lungs of vapers -- like the lungs of smokers -- have elevated levels of protease enzymes, a condition known to cause emphysema in smokers.

Exposure to outdoor air pollutants, change in emphysema, lung function
Whether exposure to outdoor air pollutants is associated with emphysema progression and change in lung function was the focus of this observational study.

Study finds link between long-term exposure to air pollution and emphysema
Long-term exposure to air pollution was linked to increases in emphysema between 2000 and 2018, according to a new study funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), both part of the National Institutes of Health.

Pollutant linked to climate change accelerates lung disease
A new multicenter study at Columbia University links long-term exposure to air pollution, especially ozone, to development of emphysema, accelerating lung disease progression as much as a pack a day of cigarettes.

Piedmont Atlanta first in Georgia to offer new minimally invasive treatment for emphysema
Piedmont Atlanta Hospital is the first in the state of Georgia to offer a new minimally invasive treatment for emphysema, a severe form of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).

MedStar Franklin Square to offer new treatment option for qualified emphysema patients
MedStar Franklin Square is the first medical facility in the state to offer endoscopic lung volume reduction (ELVR), using a new FDA-approved lung valve that is positioned in damaged lung airways without surgery, and allows patients with severe emphysema to breathe easier.

Protein may slow progression of emphysema, Rutgers study finds
A protein generated as part of our body's immune response to intestinal worms could slow the progression of emphysema, according to a Rutgers study.

Temple Lung Center director reports ongoing positive results for emphysema treatment study
Dr. Gerard Criner, MD, FACP, FACCP, Chair and Professor of Thoracic Medicine and Surgery at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, announced the 12-month results of the EMPROVE multicenter, randomized and controlled study for the Spiration® Valve System (SVS), a minimally invasive treatment for severe emphysema, at the European Respiratory Society International Congress (ERS) in Paris, France, on Sept.

Read More: Emphysema News and Emphysema Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.