Fetal brain imaging

October 03, 2005

A modified technique that uses the eyes as the line of reference means a 50 percent reduction in the time necessary to take MRI images of the fetal brain.

"One of the challenges of imaging the fetal head is that the fetus can move during the study, so it is often difficult to obtain the three different imaging views that best show intracranial anatomy especially when study time is prolonged." said Keyanoosh Hosseinzadeh, MD, Chief of Body MRI at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, and lead author of the study. "When we draw a line of reference through the eyes, and subsequent imaging is performed along that plane, we can then rapidly acquire the three imaging planes," he said.

The total examination time, using the modified technique is now about 12 minutes, Dr Hosseinzadeh said. That compares to the standard technique that can take at least twice that long, he added.

"Fetal MRI is being increasingly performed because it provides an excellent view of the brain tissue and it doesn't use radiation," said Dr. Hosseinzadeh. It is usually performed when ultrasound is inconclusive or further information is required that may change the management of the pregnancy, he said.

"Although no deleterious effects have been noted from MRI to the unborn fetus, we make every effort to minimize exposure of the fetus to the electromagnetic field; we also want to reduce the total examination time for the mother while still obtaining the appropriate diagnostic images," said Dr. Hosseinzadeh. In the past, it took several attempts - almost in a hit and miss fashion - to obtain the diagnostic images needed. This technique allows us to avoid taking unnecessary images, he said.
-end-
A provisional patent has been granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office for the technique.

The study appears in the October 2005 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

The American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS) was founded in 1900 and is the first and oldest radiology society in the U.S. The ARRS is named after Wilhelm Röentgen who discovered the x-ray in 1895. For more information, visit www.arrs.org.

American College of Radiology

Related MRI Articles from Brightsurf:

Does MRI have an environmental impact?
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have surveyed the amount of gadolinium found in river water in Tokyo.

MRI predict intelligence levels in children?
A group of researchers from the Skoltech Center for Computational and Data-Intensive Science and Engineering (CDISE) took 4th place in the international MRI-based adolescent intelligence prediction competition.

7T MRI offers new insights into multiple sclerosis
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have completed a new study using 7 Tesla (7T) MRI -- a far more powerful imaging technology -- to further examine LME in MS patients

Magnetic eyelashes: A new source of MRI artifacts
American Journal of Roentgenology researchers used a phantom to show that magnetic eyelashes worn during MRI can cause substantial artifact and that detachment of the eyelashes from the phantom can occur.

High-strength MRI tracks MS progression
The development of scars, or lesions, in the brain's cortical gray matter is a powerful predictor of neurological disability for people with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to new study.

Non-contrast MRI is effective in monitoring MS patients
Brain MRI without contrast agent is just as effective as the contrast-enhanced approach for monitoring disease progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a new study.

Researchers use MRI to predict Alzheimer's disease
MRI brain scans perform better than common clinical tests at predicting which people will go on to develop Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study.

Monitoring electromagnetic signals in the brain with MRI
MIT engineers have devised a new technique to detect either electrical activity or optical signals in the brain, using a minimally invasive technique based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

MRI 'glove' provides new look at hand anatomy
A new kind of MRI component in the shape of a glove delivers the first clear images of bones, tendons and ligaments moving together.

Why we need erasable MRI scans
Gas-filled protein structures could one day be used as 'erasable' contrast agents for MRI scans.

Read More: MRI News and MRI Current Events
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.