Nav: Home

Physical activity may help preserve lung function in individuals with asthma

October 03, 2016

In a study of adults with asthma, active individuals had slightly less lung function decline than inactive individuals.

The study included 1329 adults in Norway who were followed for an average of 11.6 years. On average, active asthmatic adults had 1.5 to 2.1 percent less decline in the FEV1/FVC ratio (forced expiratory volume 1/forced vital capacity) and 44 to 88 mL less decline in peak expiratory flow during follow-up.

If confirmed in other studies, the findings would contribute to the understanding of modifiable lifestyle factors, other than smoking cessation, for protecting the lungs of people with asthma.

"Generally we observed similar annual declines in lung function between physically active and inactive adults with asthma, however there was a slight tendency for the results to favor the active," said Dr. Ben Brumpton, lead author of the Respirology study.
-end-


Wiley

Related Asthma Articles:

Insomnia prevalent in patients with asthma
A team of researchers from the University of Pittsburgh has found that insomnia is highly prevalent in adults with asthma and is also associated with worse asthma control, depression and anxiety symptoms and other quality of life and health issues.
Test used to diagnose asthma may not be accurate
A new study urges caution in the use of the mannitol challenge test for asthma in non-clinical settings.
Turning off asthma attacks
Working with human immune cells in the laboratory, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have identified a critical cellular 'off' switch for the inflammatory immune response that contributes to lung-constricting asthma attacks.
Access to asthma meds, plus flu vaccines, keep kids with asthma healthy
Kids need flu shots to prevent asthma flares, and medications available in school to keep 86 percent in class, according to two studies being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting.
Discovery could lead to better asthma treatment
Scientists have made a discovery that could lead to improved treatment for asthma sufferers.
Do asthma and COPD truly exist?
Defining a patient's symptoms using the historical diagnostic labels of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an outdated approach to understanding an individual's condition, according to experts writing in the European Respiratory Journal today.
Asthma in many adolescents is not an allergic disease
New research indicates that asthma in many adolescents is not likely to involve inflammation of the airways and therefore should not be considered an allergic disease.
First classification of severe asthma
Severe asthma can have a devastating effect on sufferers, affecting their ability to work or go to school and to lead normal lives.
Exploring 'clinical conundrum' of asthma-COPD overlap in nonsmokers with chronic asthma
Researchers may be closer to finding the mechanism responsible for loss of lung elastic recoil and airflow limitation in nonsmokers with chronic asthma.
Asthma app helps control asthma: Alerts allergists when sufferers need assistance
New study in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology shows how an app directly connecting an allergist and an asthma sufferer can provide necessary intervention when asthma isn't under control.

Related Asthma Reading:

The Asthma Educator's Handbook
by Christopher H. Fanta (Author), Elisabeth S. Stieb (Author), Elaine L. Carter (Author), Kenan E. Haver (Author)

Breathe To Heal: Break Free From Asthma (Breathing Normalization)
by BreathingCenter

A Cure for Asthma?: What Your Doctor Isn't Telling You--and Why by David L. Hahn MD MS (2013) Paperback
by David L. Hahn MD MS (Author)

Healing the New Childhood Epidemics: Autism, ADHD, Asthma, and Allergies: The Groundbreaking Program for the 4-A Disorders
by Kenneth Bock (Author), Cameron Stauth (Author)

Off The Meds: The Surprising Path To Ending Suffering From Asthma and Allergies
by Difference Press

The Allergy and Asthma Cure: A Complete 8-Step Nutritional Program
by Fred Pescatore M.D. (Author)

Heterogeneity in Asthma (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology)
by Allan R. Brasier (Editor)

No More Allergies, Asthma or Sinus Infections: The Revolutionary Approach
by Lon Jones D.O. (Author)

ABC of Asthma, Allergies & Lupus: Eradicate Asthma - Now!
by F. Batmanghelidj (Author)

I Have Asthma (What Do You Know About? Books)
by Jennifer Moore-Mallinos (Author), Marta Fabrega (Illustrator)

Best Science Podcasts 2019

We have hand picked the best science podcasts for 2019. Sit back and enjoy new science podcasts updated daily from your favorite science news services and scientists.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Approaching With Kindness
We often forget to say the words "thank you." But can those two words change how you — and those around you — look at the world? This hour, TED speakers on the power of gratitude and appreciation. Guests include author AJ Jacobs, author and former baseball player Mike Robbins, Dr. Laura Trice, Professor of Management Christine Porath, and former Danish politician Özlem Cekic.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#509 Anisogamy: The Beginning of Male and Female
This week we discuss how the sperm and egg came to be, and how a difference of reproductive interest has led to sexual conflict in bed bugs. We'll be speaking with Dr. Geoff Parker, an evolutionary biologist credited with developing a theory to explain the evolution of two sexes, about anisogamy, sexual reproduction through the fusion of two different gametes: the egg and the sperm. Then we'll speak with Dr. Roberto Pereira, research scientist in urban entomology at the University of Florida, about traumatic insemination in bed bugs.