Nav: Home

Crossing new frontiers in melanoma research

October 03, 2018

In a Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research article, world-leading experts identify emerging frontiers in skin cancer and pigment diseases.

Melanoma is a deadly type of skin cancer that arises from pigment-forming cells. The article challenges the field by addressing provoking questions in melanoma immunotherapy, cancer systems biology, medical and surgical oncology, pigment biophysics, and precision prevention of skin diseases such as melanoma.

"Diversity and individuality, but also health disparities, are fundamental topics rooted in the research, which focuses on melanocytes, the pigment-producing cells of the skin," said lead author Dr. Fabian Filipp, of the University of California, Merced.

In a joint effort, the pigment cell research community tackles timely aspects of big data science across international boundaries, health care reforms, bioethical considerations of direct-to-consumer diagnostics, health disparities among underserved minorities, and precision medicine based on individuality.

"A key realization is that successes in the translational arena of melanoma need to be duplicated in other key areas of pigment cell research, including vitiligo, melasma, albinism, and other pigmentary diseases," Dr. Filipp explained. He noted that collaborative, cross-disciplinary team science is exemplified by the International Federation of Pigment Cell Societies. This forum promotes global scientific interchange among basic and clinical investigators working on cutting-edge aspects of melanocyte biology and disease, and is unified around a passion for understanding pigmentation and pigmentary diseases.
-end-


Wiley

Related Melanoma Articles:

Blood test for deadly eye melanoma
A simple blood test could soon become the latest monitoring tool for the early detection of melanoma in the eye.
Analysis of melanoma in US by age groups
This study used registry data to determine annual rates of melanoma in pediatric, adolescent, young adult and adult age groups, and the findings suggest an apparent decrease among adolescent and young adults between 2006 and 2015 but increases in older adults.
Vitamin D dials down the aggression in melanoma cells
Vitamin D influences the behaviour of melanoma cells in the lab by making them less aggressive, Cancer Research UK scientists have found.
B cells linked to immunotherapy for melanoma
Immunotherapy uses our body's own immune system to fight cancer.
Five things to know about melanoma
'Five things to know about ... melanoma' in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) provides a brief overview of this malignant skin cancer for physicians and patients.
Describing aspects of melanoma progression
Three related articles and an editorial focus on various aspects of melanoma progression.
Is your melanoma hot enough for immunotherapy?
University of Colorado Cancer Center study presented at AACR 2019 shows that tumors with mutations in genes leading to over-activation of the NF-kB signaling pathway were more than three times as likely to respond to anti-PD1 immunotherapy compared with tumors in which these changes were absent.
BU researchers discover therapeutic target of melanoma
Researchers have identified a biomarker and a possible new therapy for melanoma.
Seawater bacteria provides leads to fight melanoma
Malignant melanoma can be a particularly dangerous form of cancer, and more therapeutic options are needed.
New drug combination could be more effective against melanoma
A new study from MIT suggests that combining kinase inhibitors with experimental drugs known as ribonucleases could lead to better results.
More Melanoma News and Melanoma Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans 2.0
More than test scores or good grades–what do kids need for the future? This hour, TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, both during and after this time of crisis. Guests include educators Richard Culatta and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Space
One of the most consistent questions we get at the show is from parents who want to know which episodes are kid-friendly and which aren't. So today, we're releasing a separate feed, Radiolab for Kids. To kick it off, we're rerunning an all-time favorite episode: Space. In the 60's, space exploration was an American obsession. This hour, we chart the path from romance to increasing cynicism. We begin with Ann Druyan, widow of Carl Sagan, with a story about the Voyager expedition, true love, and a golden record that travels through space. And astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson explains the Coepernican Principle, and just how insignificant we are. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.