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New information for women faced with infertility

October 03, 2018

A new Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research study offers infertile women new information regarding their expected probabilities of becoming pregnant and may help them select the optimal treatment based on their various risk factors.

In an analysis of the medical records of 1,864 female infertile patients in Tokyo from 2000-2015, 49.4% and 21.9% of patients conceived after being treated with assisted reproductive technology (ART) and non-ART, respectively. Age over 35 years, advanced endometriosis, and a past history or current presence of uterine fibroids had negative impacts on the outcome of non-ART. The effect of advanced endometriosis was especially high for patients in their 30s. ART treatment for patients with advanced endometriosis was effective.

ART treatments include in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection, while non-ART treatments include mild ovarian stimulation together with timed intercourse and/or intra-uterine insemination.

"Some women in their early 30's may be suffering from advanced stage endometriosis and will remain to be infertile unless they are extensively treated," said co-author Dr. Osamu Wada-Hiraike, of The University of Tokyo.
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Wiley

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