Nav: Home

Cataracts linked to higher risks of osteoporosis and fracture

October 03, 2018

A new Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study has evaluated the potential impacts of cataracts and cataract surgery on the risks of osteoporosis and bone fractures.

For the study, researchers at Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital in Taiwan studied 57,972 cataract patients who were matched to 57,972 healthy controls. During an average follow-up time of 6.4 years, 17,450 patients developed osteoporosis or fractures in the cataract group, and 12,627 in the non-cataract group. The diagnosis of cataracts was associated with a 29% increased risk of developing osteoporosis or fracture. In analyses for each individual event, the diagnosis of cataracts was associated with a 43% increased risk of osteoporosis, a 16% increased risk of hip fracture, a 25% increased risk of vertebral fracture, and a 24% increased risk of other fractures. In the cataract group, patients who underwent cataract surgery had a 42% lower risk of developing osteoporosis or fracture.

"Appropriate management of cataracts may decrease osteoporosis and fracture risks," said first author Dr. Huei-Kai Huang. "I strongly recommend all elders with osteoporosis or fractures to check their vision," added co-author Dr. Ching-Hui Loh.
-end-


Wiley

Related Osteoporosis Articles:

New pharmaceutical target reverses osteoporosis in mice
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have discovered that an adenosine receptor called A2B can be pharmaceutically activated to reverse bone degradation caused by osteoporosis in mouse models of the disease.
A link between mitochondrial damage and osteoporosis
In healthy people, a tightly controlled process balances out the activity of osteoblasts, which build bone, and osteoclasts, which break it down.
Many stroke patients not screened for osteoporosis, despite known risks
Many stroke survivors have an increased risk of osteoporosis, falls or breaks when compared to healthy people.
Many postmenopausal women do not receive treatment for osteoporosis
The benefits of treating osteoporosis in postmenopausal women outweigh the perceived risks, according to a Clinical Practice Guideline issued today by the Endocrine Society.
A new 'atlas' of genetic influences on osteoporosis
A ground-breaking new study led by researchers from the Lady Davis Institute (LDI) at the Jewish General Hospital (JGH) has succeeded in compiling an atlas of genetic factors associated with estimated bone mineral density (BMD), one of the most clinically relevant factors in diagnosing osteoporosis.
New recommendations for the conduct of economic evaluations in osteoporosis
An expert working group has established recommendations for the design and conduct of economic evaluations in osteoporosis, as well as guidance for reporting these evaluations.
From receptor structure to new osteoporosis drugs
Researchers at the University of Zurich have determined the three-dimensional structure of a receptor that controls the release of calcium from bones.
How a Mediterranean diet could reduce osteoporosis
Eating a Mediterranean-type diet could reduce bone loss in people with osteoporosis -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia.
Osteoporosis drug may benefit heart health
The osteoporosis drug alendronate was linked with a reduced risk of cardiovascular death, heart attack, and stroke in a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study of patients with hip fractures.
New treatment for osteoporosis provides better protection against fractures
A new treatment for osteoporosis provides major improvements in bone density and more effective protection against fractures than the current standard treatment.
More Osteoporosis News and Osteoporosis Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Teaching For Better Humans 2.0
More than test scores or good grades–what do kids need for the future? This hour, TED speakers explore how to help children grow into better humans, both during and after this time of crisis. Guests include educators Richard Culatta and Liz Kleinrock, psychologist Thomas Curran, and writer Jacqueline Woodson.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Space
One of the most consistent questions we get at the show is from parents who want to know which episodes are kid-friendly and which aren't. So today, we're releasing a separate feed, Radiolab for Kids. To kick it off, we're rerunning an all-time favorite episode: Space. In the 60's, space exploration was an American obsession. This hour, we chart the path from romance to increasing cynicism. We begin with Ann Druyan, widow of Carl Sagan, with a story about the Voyager expedition, true love, and a golden record that travels through space. And astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson explains the Coepernican Principle, and just how insignificant we are. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.