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Interferential current offers solution to painful sex

October 03, 2018

CLEVELAND, Ohio (October 3, 2018)--Insufficient estrogen creates an array of physical changes in women, some of which limit the ability to enjoy sex. A new study offers hope, however, by demonstrating the effectiveness of interferential current in improving lubrication, pain, orgasm, and overall satisfaction for women with premature ovarian insufficiency who are taking hormones. Study results will be presented during The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting in San Diego, October 3-6, 2018.

Premature ovarian insufficiency is the loss of normal function of the ovaries before age 40, resulting in insufficient estrogen. This often leads to infertility because eggs are not released regularly. For many women with this problem, it also causes a lack of lubrication which leads to painful sex and limits orgasm. Vaginal estriol creme has previously been recognized as a possible treatment option. In this new study out of Brazil, interferential current was evaluated for its comparative benefits. Interferential current uses high frequency signals that penetrate the skin and the deeper lying muscle tissue.

The study, which included women between the ages of 18 and 50 who are taking hormones, demonstrated that, while both treatments improved lubrication and pain, interferential current was more effective in also improving orgasm and overall sexual satisfaction.

"We were encouraged with these results as they reveal a new alternative for the treatment of sexual complaints," says Dr. Helena Giraldo, lead author of the study from the University of Campinas in Brazil.

"Although this was a small study, it opens the door for further research that will help identify more options for women to help improve their overall quality of life by making their sexual experience more enjoyable," says Dr. JoAnn Pinkerton, NAMS executive director.
-end-
Drs. Giraldo and Pinkerton are available for interviews before the presentation at the Annual Meeting.

Founded in 1989, The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) is North America's leading nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting the health and quality of life of all women during midlife and beyond through an understanding of menopause and healthy aging. Its multidisciplinary membership of 2,000 leaders in the field--including clinical and basic science experts from medicine, nursing, sociology, psychology, nutrition, anthropology, epidemiology, pharmacy, and education--makes NAMS uniquely qualified to serve as the definitive resource for health professionals and the public for accurate, unbiased information about menopause and healthy aging. To learn more about NAMS, visit http://www.menopause.org.

The North American Menopause Society (NAMS)

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