Nav: Home

Riffyn launches Open Access for scientists at non-profits

October 03, 2018

Oakland, CA, USA, 3 October 2018 - Riffyn, a global provider of cloud-based experiment design and data analytics software, has launched Riffyn Open Access which provides free use of its patented Scientific Development Environment (SDE™) to any member of a non-profit organization. Open Access users have a full-featured Riffyn SDE™ account to create and openly share reusable experimental methods and data on the platform.

"Riffyn SDE represents a paradigm shift in the design, execution and sharing of scientific procedures and data analysis," said Dr. Timothy Gardner, Founder/CEO of Riffyn. "Riffyn SDE has undergone four years of intensive development in industrial biotech and pharmaceutical R&D settings. We felt it was time to offer the capability openly to the academic community, most of whom do not have the means to implement industrially-proven data systems like Riffyn SDE."

Riffyn SDE was created to address the crisis in scientific reproducibility and demands for more cost-efficient drug development. Its potential to transform the quality and reusability of scientific work was recently demonstrated in a ground-breaking study published in Scientific Data by Delft University of Technology and Riffyn. The study harnessed Riffyn SDE to execute a complex set of microbial fermentation experiments.

"Riffyn SDE's systematic description of experimental methods eliminates many limitations that are inherent to traditional lab protocols and methods sections in journals," explained Dr. Jack Pronk, Professor of Industrial Microbiology at Delft University of Technology and co-author of the study. "I expect this type of detailed, web-based description of experimental procedures to become the new standard in scientific publications, thereby increasing the repeatability of scientific research and facilitating meaningful reuse of published data."

The Delft study utilized Riffyn SDE to fully define, capture, analyze, and publish scientific experiments in much the same way that CAD software is used to design, test and improve discrete products. Notably, the Scientific Data article replaced its standard materials and methods section with a link to the experiments and data in Riffyn SDE itself. Riffyn SDE delivers all the experimental methods, their associated data, and their analysis scripts in a modular, reusable, and instantly computable digital medium.
-end-
For further information contact:

Riffyn
E: media@riffyn.com
T: +1-510-543-0077

Sciad Communications, Media Relations
Emma Pickup / Deborah Cockerill / Juliette Craggs
E: riffyn@sciad.com
T: +44 (0)20 7470 8801

Notes to Editors

About Riffyn

Riffyn is a provider of research design, data capture, and analytics software (SaaS) to biotech, pharmaceutical, food and chemical industries. Riffyn's cloud-based Scientific Development Environment (Riffyn SDE) delivers trustworthy data and real-time analytics to R&D organizations who want more productive, reliable science. The Riffyn SDE gives customers the power to achieve repeatable outcomes, faster discoveries, and right-first-time technology scale-up. Riffyn serves enterprise R&D customers across the North America, Europe, Asia and South America. For more information, visit: http://www.riffyn.com.

SCIAD

Related Technology Articles:

Technology in higher education: learning with it instead of from it
Technology has shifted the way that professors teach students in higher education.
Post-lithium technology
Next-generation batteries will probably see the replacement of lithium ions by more abundant and environmentally benign alkali metal or multivalent ions.
Rethinking the role of technology in the classroom
Introducing tablets and laptops to the classroom has certain educational virtues, according to Annahita Ball, an assistant professor in the University at Buffalo School of Social Work, but her research suggests that tech has its limitations as well.
The science and technology of FAST
The Five hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST), located in a radio quiet zone, with the targets (e.g., radio pulsars and neutron stars, galactic and extragalactic 21-cm HI emission).
AI technology could help protect water supplies
Progress on new artificial intelligence (AI) technology could make monitoring at water treatment plants cheaper and easier and help safeguard public health.
Transformative technology
UC Davis neuroscientists have developed fluorescence sensors that are opening a new era for the optical recording of dopamine activity in the living brain.
Do the elderly want technology to help them take their medication?
Over 65s say they would find technology to help them take their medications helpful, but need the technology to be familiar, accessible and easy to use, according to research by Queen Mary University of London and University of Cambridge.
Technology detecting RNase activity
A KAIST research team of Professor Hyun Gyu Park at Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering developed a new technology to detect the activity of RNase H, a RNA degrading enzyme.
Taking technology to the next level
Physicists from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS) developed a new hybrid integrated platform, promising to be a more advanced alternative to conventional integrated circuits.
How technology use affects at-risk adolescents
More use of technology led to increases in attention, behavior and self-regulation problems over time for adolescents already at risk for mental health issues, a new study from Duke University finds.
More Technology News and Technology Current Events

Trending Science News

Current Coronavirus (COVID-19) News

Top Science Podcasts

We have hand picked the top science podcasts of 2020.
Now Playing: TED Radio Hour

Uncharted
There's so much we've yet to explore–from outer space to the deep ocean to our own brains. This hour, Manoush goes on a journey through those uncharted places, led by TED Science Curator David Biello.
Now Playing: Science for the People

#556 The Power of Friendship
It's 2020 and times are tough. Maybe some of us are learning about social distancing the hard way. Maybe we just are all a little anxious. No matter what, we could probably use a friend. But what is a friend, exactly? And why do we need them so much? This week host Bethany Brookshire speaks with Lydia Denworth, author of the new book "Friendship: The Evolution, Biology, and Extraordinary Power of Life's Fundamental Bond". This episode is hosted by Bethany Brookshire, science writer from Science News.
Now Playing: Radiolab

Dispatch 1: Numbers
In a recent Radiolab group huddle, with coronavirus unraveling around us, the team found themselves grappling with all the numbers connected to COVID-19. Our new found 6 foot bubbles of personal space. Three percent mortality rate (or 1, or 2, or 4). 7,000 cases (now, much much more). So in the wake of that meeting, we reflect on the onslaught of numbers - what they reveal, and what they hide.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.