UD hosts conference on knowledge-based partnerships Nov. 2

October 04, 2007

Chad Holliday, chairman and chief executive officer of DuPont, and Abby Joseph Cohen, partner and chief U.S. investment strategist with Goldman Sachs & Co., will be featured speakers at a University of Delaware conference, "Creating Knowledge-Based Partnerships: Challenges and Opportunities," to be held Friday, Nov. 2, in Clayton Hall, on the Laird Campus in Newark, Del.

The conference is the first in a new series of programs designed to engage University, government and business leaders in the challenges and opportunities for partnership and to highlight opportunities for enhanced future partnerships. The conference will consider issues in corporate governance, alternative energy, life sciences, the environment, agriculture and advanced materials in a series of panel discussions.

"Since I came to Delaware, I have been impressed by the opportunities for partnerships among higher education, business and government at all levels," UD President Patrick Harker said. "I look forward to strengthening the University's contribution to such partnerships.

"With global competition, knowledge-based partnerships will play an increasingly important role in the advancement of the state, and the nation, throughout the 21st century," he said. "This conference is an important first step in identifying Delaware's strengths and in laying the groundwork for increased partnerships between the state's academic institutions, government and the private sector."

The daylong conference will include a welcome by Delaware Gov. Ruth Ann Minner, a morning talk by Holliday on "Rising Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and Employing America for a Brighter Economic Future" and luncheon remarks by Cohen.

Several business, government and educational leaders will participate in panel discussions. Respondents to the keynote speech and participants in panel discussions will include U.S. Sen. Tom Carper (D-Del.); Rep. Mike Castle (R-Del.); Jack Markell, Delaware State treasurer; Terry Kelly, CEO of W.L. Gore & Associates; Alan Levin, chairman of the Delaware State Chamber of Commerce; and Barbara Alving, director of the National Institutes of Health National Center for Research Resources. Several University of Delaware faculty members also will be participating.

For the complete schedule, visit [www.udel.edu/partnerships/agenda].
-end-
The conference is sponsored by UD, the Office of the Governor, the Delaware State Chamber of Commerce, the Delaware Public Policy Institute, the Delaware Business Roundtable, First State Innovation, Select Greater Philadelphia and the News Journal.

Cost of this conference is $25, and registration is open on a space-available basis until Oct. 26. Additional conference information and online registration are available at [www.udel.edu/partnerships].

University of Delaware

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